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Project 52Minnie's 2021 Project 52

The goal of Project 52 is to take a photo a week. This is an easier pace than the Project 365.
- Start a thread with your name such as, "MyName's 52" or "MyName's Photo-a-Week Project" so other members can easily track your project. Some Posts May Be NSFW. If you intend to post any questionable images, please include NSFW in the title
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St3v3Murray
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Re: Minnie's 2021 Project 52

Post by St3v3Murray »

minniev wrote:
Wed Jul 28, 2021 7:58 pm
Things in a row

Birds
I wonder if that is a hunting strategy, like a net they cast across an opening to help one another.

Either way, it is well captured and presented! Thank you for sharing this with us! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by minniev »

Psjunkie wrote:
Wed Jul 28, 2021 8:19 pm
Wonderfully done......
Thank ya Frank, but they did all the work of lining themselves up. I just sneaked up on them and caught this group before they bolted, which they always do. Must've been 100 egrets when I saw them through the trees, just next to the dam.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by minniev »

St3v3Murray wrote:
Wed Jul 28, 2021 10:56 pm
minniev wrote:
Wed Jul 28, 2021 7:58 pm
Things in a row

Birds
I wonder if that is a hunting strategy, like a net they cast across an opening to help one another.

Either way, it is well captured and presented! Thank you for sharing this with us! S-
Thanks for taking a look. I don't see egrets team up very often. Pelicans do it all the time. I agree this group did appear to be working together. But a lot of them are little egrets, which are migratory and I don't have enough chance to get to know them well. Maybe they're pack hunters since they come here together and leave together. They've stayed longer than usual this year. Maybe, like the geese, they are contemplating a permanent move.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by St3v3Murray »

minniev wrote:
Thu Jul 29, 2021 7:13 pm
Thanks for taking a look. I don't see egrets team up very often. Pelicans do it all the time. I agree this group did appear to be working together. But a lot of them are little egrets, which are migratory and I don't have enough chance to get to know them well. Maybe they're pack hunters since they come here together and leave together. They've stayed longer than usual this year. Maybe, like the geese, they are contemplating a permanent move.
I'm curious if you've learned anything about the subjects you photograph, like do you know more about the birds than just their names?

I was thinking about this in my own work and how I sometimes take photos of places I don't even know the names of let alone the history. I'm not looking to write a documentary on the subject but I've been thinking it would be nice to have a better relationship with the subject even if it means doing a little research after and maybe coming back to it again if possible to see it in a different light. I'm looking for a better connection. S-
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Post by minniev »

St3v3Murray wrote:
Thu Jul 29, 2021 9:30 pm

I'm curious if you've learned anything about the subjects you photograph, like do you know more about the birds than just their names?

I was thinking about this in my own work and how I sometimes take photos of places I don't even know the names of let alone the history. I'm not looking to write a documentary on the subject but I've been thinking it would be nice to have a better relationship with the subject even if it means doing a little research after and maybe coming back to it again if possible to see it in a different light. I'm looking for a better connection. S-
Learning about my feathered pals has been an ongoing pleasure. I've come to know more about the dam too - its history, the people charged with protecting and maintaining it, its weaknesses and strengths.

But the birds are what keeps me going back. The resident birds - the great blue herons and the great white egrets are the ongoing population. They vie for dominance, for fishing perches between groups. But within the group they also compete for advantageous spots, and for mates. There are more and less aggressive birds in each group. They have adapted from wading birds to diving birds and blues and whites have different techniques for that. Then the migrant groups come through at different times of the year - pelicans, gulls, terns, and little egrets. The most aggressive of these groups are the little egrets, the guys with the yellow clown feet. All of them manage to co-exist in a shifting pattern of players on the various stages.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by St3v3Murray »

minniev wrote:
Fri Jul 30, 2021 11:55 pm
St3v3Murray wrote:
Thu Jul 29, 2021 9:30 pm

I'm curious if you've learned anything about the subjects you photograph, like do you know more about the birds than just their names?

I was thinking about this in my own work and how I sometimes take photos of places I don't even know the names of let alone the history. I'm not looking to write a documentary on the subject but I've been thinking it would be nice to have a better relationship with the subject even if it means doing a little research after and maybe coming back to it again if possible to see it in a different light. I'm looking for a better connection. S-
Learning about my feathered pals has been an ongoing pleasure. I've come to know more about the dam too - its history, the people charged with protecting and maintaining it, its weaknesses and strengths.

But the birds are what keeps me going back. The resident birds - the great blue herons and the great white egrets are the ongoing population. They vie for dominance, for fishing perches between groups. But within the group they also compete for advantageous spots, and for mates. There are more and less aggressive birds in each group. They have adapted from wading birds to diving birds and blues and whites have different techniques for that. Then the migrant groups come through at different times of the year - pelicans, gulls, terns, and little egrets. The most aggressive of these groups are the little egrets, the guys with the yellow clown feet. All of them manage to co-exist in a shifting pattern of players on the various stages.
In the past, you mentioned your work with the local agencies to bring awareness to the project, Did anything come if it to leave a legacy? S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by minniev »

St3v3Murray wrote:
Sat Jul 31, 2021 12:08 am
minniev wrote:
Fri Jul 30, 2021 11:55 pm
St3v3Murray wrote:
Thu Jul 29, 2021 9:30 pm

I'm curious if you've learned anything about the subjects you photograph, like do you know more about the birds than just their names?

I was thinking about this in my own work and how I sometimes take photos of places I don't even know the names of let alone the history. I'm not looking to write a documentary on the subject but I've been thinking it would be nice to have a better relationship with the subject even if it means doing a little research after and maybe coming back to it again if possible to see it in a different light. I'm looking for a better connection. S-
Learning about my feathered pals has been an ongoing pleasure. I've come to know more about the dam too - its history, the people charged with protecting and maintaining it, its weaknesses and strengths.

But the birds are what keeps me going back. The resident birds - the great blue herons and the great white egrets are the ongoing population. They vie for dominance, for fishing perches between groups. But within the group they also compete for advantageous spots, and for mates. There are more and less aggressive birds in each group. They have adapted from wading birds to diving birds and blues and whites have different techniques for that. Then the migrant groups come through at different times of the year - pelicans, gulls, terns, and little egrets. The most aggressive of these groups are the little egrets, the guys with the yellow clown feet. All of them manage to co-exist in a shifting pattern of players on the various stages.
In the past, you mentioned your work with the local agencies to bring awareness to the project, Did anything come if it to leave a legacy? S-
Indirectly. We are developing a nature photography branch of the environmental group. And I’m having conversations with an online friend who has published photo travel books about how to pitch a coffee table book bout the birds. You never know what may happen..
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by St3v3Murray »

minniev wrote:
Sat Jul 31, 2021 2:52 am
St3v3Murray wrote:
Sat Jul 31, 2021 12:08 am
In the past, you mentioned your work with the local agencies to bring awareness to the project, Did anything come if it to leave a legacy? S-
Indirectly. We are developing a nature photography branch of the environmental group. And I’m having conversations with an online friend who has published photo travel books about how to pitch a coffee table book bout the birds. You never know what may happen..
Wow, that's amazing, and it all started with you noticing something everyone else looked past. Thank you for sharing this! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by minniev »

This week's theme: using distortion tools


the first one is a new dam bird photo with a small wave turned into a tsunami and some stars distorted and dragged through the holes in the structure, then some fish folded up and stuffed into a basket.

The second is a composite of two older swamp shots, using the linear blur tool and the mixer brush.
Attachments
distort.jpg
sw (1 of 1).jpg
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by Psjunkie »

Both artistically done.......Nice..!

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