Welcome new members. If you have been recently invited to join our forum, welcome.
Please take a few minutes to introduce yourself at The Meeting Room / General Discussions / Introduce yourself

Monthly Masters DiscussionMonthly Masters' Discussion - May 2020 - Clarence White's "Morning" - Fine Art Photography At Home

Hosted by MinnieV
A monthly discussion on people who have influenced photography, directly or indirectly.
Come join us.
Post Reply
User avatar
minniev
Mentoris Supremus
Mentoris Supremus
Posts: 6697
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 3:55 am
Location: Mississippi
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Monthly Masters' Discussion - May 2020 - Clarence White's "Morning" - Fine Art Photography At Home

Post by minniev »

Introduction
This month we will look at the image “Morning - the Bathroom” by Clarence H. White. A self-taught photographer from rural Ohio, White became famous for his delicate, idealized images of simple family life. His photographic career spanned from 1900-1925. He was a charter member of the Photo-Secession in 1902, a frequent contributor to Camera Work and, and a member of Alfred Stieglitz’s inner circle. White taught photography at Columbia University Teachers College, the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Science and the Seguinland School of Photography. He eventually founded the Clarence H. White School of Photography in New York, with the painter Max Weber, who infused the pedagogy with the design principles and formal painterly concerns from his recent experiences studying art in Paris.

White has been called the archetypal Pictorialist photographer in the US. He encouraged students to find their own creative vision, nurtured many talents, and his school provided them with fine technical training and a useful background in design and art theory. Supportive of the practical applications of artistic photography, in 1920 White joined his school to other institutions, to form The Art Center in New York. The influence of his school, in the meticulous attention to technique, formal design and print quality, was carried into the world through his many students, among them Anton Bruehl, Margaret Bourke-White,Dorothea Lange, Paul Outerbridge, and Ralph Steiner.

Questions To Consider
1. Pictorialism was a movement born of the argument that persists yet today: is photography an art or a science? Pictorialists contended that photographs could be works of art, and that certain techniques could move photography from a mere technical process to art works. Pictorialists favored art education for photographers, and application of principles of composition, light, and tone to evoke emotional responses to the image. There are differences of opinion about whether photography is art or not. What do YOU think? Is this photograph an art work? Why or why not? Are your photographs (or some of them) art works? Explain your thinking on this question.
2. What do you think of this image? Does the composition work? Does the main subject draw your attention? Is the image interesting? What do you think of the use of light? Do you like the image? Would you want it on your wall? Why or why not?
3. One of the techniques that many pictorialists employed was deliberate blur. Some felt that the use of blur enhanced the artistic nature of the images rather than simply having a perfect representation of the subject that was akin to “a scientific document”. What are your thoughts about this concept? Does the blur in this image add value or detract? Have you ever deliberately blurred an image for an effect? If so, we invite you to attach an image of your own that employs blur for artistic effect.
4. All of us are impacted in some ways by formal or informal restrictions on our movement and limited access to the shooting locations we are accustomed to visiting. This platinum print was made in the photographer’s home with no props or special lighting, using a family member as a model, in a time when photography was much more cumbersome than it is now. In fact, many of White’s best images were made in or around his home with humble scenes and subjects. How has being restricted in movement affected your photography? Have you found a way to make at-home photography interesting? Have you learned something new, in shooting or editing? Would you share something you’ve created during this time? And please also share how the limitations of this strange time have impacted your creativity, either positively or negatively, or both.

Links For Further Study

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarence_Hudson_White
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pictorialism
https://iphf.org/inductees/clarence-h-white/
https://www.moma.org/interactives/objec ... ls/17.html
https://archive.artic.edu/stieglitz/clarence-h-white/
https://artmuseum.princeton.edu/story/c ... %80%931925
http://ndmagazine.net/photographer/clar ... son-white/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjOPQg0iIIs
Attachments
fair use: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/267724?pkgids=173
fair use: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/267724?pkgids=173
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

User avatar
PietFrancke
Mentoris Maximus
Mentoris Maximus
Posts: 2770
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:38 pm
Location: WV
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by PietFrancke »

seductive, ethereal, wonderful use of blur, and translucent fabrics on windows and bodies are like fog, furthering the mystery and delicacy of the image. As with many paintings, we provide our own interpretation, not all the questions are answered, there is a story that we become part of and that we help write. Art is like pornography, it defies all objective descriptions, and yet, we absolutely know it when we see it. For me, this is art.

The world touched the artist and the artist changed. And the artist shared something from deep within, and then, we are changed. We feel something that perhaps defies explicit definition, but we know we felt something - like a haunting. You know it is art when you are haunted.

User avatar
minniev
Mentoris Supremus
Mentoris Supremus
Posts: 6697
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 3:55 am
Location: Mississippi
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by minniev »

PietFrancke wrote:
Fri May 01, 2020 11:11 pm
seductive, ethereal, wonderful use of blur, and translucent fabrics on windows and bodies are like fog, furthering the mystery and delicacy of the image. As with many paintings, we provide our own interpretation, not all the questions are answered, there is a story that we become part of and that we help write. Art is like pornography, it defies all objective descriptions, and yet, we absolutely know it when we see it. For me, this is art.

The world touched the artist and the artist changed. And the artist shared something from deep within, and then, we are changed. We feel something that perhaps defies explicit definition, but we know we felt something - like a haunting. You know it is art when you are haunted.
Thanks Piet, for jumping aboard. I have always liked White’s work for the same reasons you describe. It seems he was “onto something” about art and photography very early on.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests