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Monthly Masters DiscussionMonthly Masters' Discussion: June 2017 - Cartier-Bresson and The Decisive Moment

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Charles Haacker
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Re: Monthly Masters' Discussion: Cartier-Bresson and The Decisive Moment - Share Your Thoughts

Post by Charles Haacker » Mon Oct 23, 2017 3:01 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:Chuck, I prefer the photo you linked for me. It reminded me of one I took of our granddaughter doing just what you described, going upstairs in a tearing hurry. She even raced out of her slippers, one of which sits on the step. How she didn't break a leg is the mystery of childhood. And she was going to something, not from, as you suggested in the C-B photo. Thanks for your posting the link. Matt
I love the picture you got! One of the best things about it is the motion blur. That is in fact a decisive moment, and you were ready! :yay:
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Post by Charles Haacker » Mon Oct 23, 2017 3:12 pm

St3v3M wrote:7 Tips for Capturing the Decisive Moment in Street Photography

"There is probably no other term as often cited as “The Decisive Moment” in Street Photography. Yet there is no real agreement what a decisive moment defines.

The street is normally a very chaotic place. People are walking in every direction and there isn’t much “sense” when putting everything together. The decisive moment is different. Suddenly every single detail that is captured in the photograph has a meaning. Subjects that are normally not connected are in a relation to each other, they don’t know it, but the picture clearly shows it."

That's a great link! Thanks, Steve. Sebastian Jacobitz makes strong points, including and maybe especially about overcoming shyness. I still am convinced I could never do it. I have the instincts (my candids prove it I think) but no way could I do what I normally do surrounded by total strangers. But my personal experience tells me that there really is a kindofa sortofa "sixth sense," and that it can be honed and polished. H C-B himself was quoted as saying, “Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.” My interpretation of that is that it takes 10,000 photographs to begin to develop that indefinable something that goes to work in that literal fraction of a second that you see it in your finder and trip the shutter. I've somewhat shamefacedly confessed to shooting bursts of about 3 in such situations, but it still surprises me how often the first exposure is still the right one, just as it would have had to have been in the days before bursts were even possible.
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All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Matt Quinn
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Post by Matt Quinn » Mon Oct 23, 2017 5:05 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Matt Quinn wrote:Chuck, I prefer the photo you linked for me. It reminded me of one I took of our granddaughter doing just what you described, going upstairs in a tearing hurry. She even raced out of her slippers, one of which sits on the step. How she didn't break a leg is the mystery of childhood. And she was going to something, not from, as you suggested in the C-B photo. Thanks for your posting the link. Matt
I love the picture you got! One of the best things about it is the motion blur. That is in fact a decisive moment, and you were ready! :yay:


Thank you Chuck. Great moments in the life of a grandparent, kept for remembering. Matt
Matt Quinn

"...approach the light as opposed to the subject." Stan Godwin

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Post by St3v3M » Mon Oct 23, 2017 5:35 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:That's a great link! Thanks, Steve. Sebastian Jacobitz makes strong points, including and maybe especially about overcoming shyness. I still am convinced I could never do it. I have the instincts (my candids prove it I think) but no way could I do what I normally do surrounded by total strangers. But my personal experience tells me that there really is a kindofa sortofa "sixth sense," and that it can be honed and polished. ...

I have a story that may help.
- When my son was young he wanted a pet and he liked the exotics so we eventually ended up with a Ball Python named Snakey. Like most people, I was afraid of snakes so everytime I went near her I'd think she was trying to bite me. My son would stick his hand in her cage while looking somewhere else, clumsily move it around until he found her, grab her by wherever and bring her out. He'd give her kisses and I swear she did the same. I'd look at her and you'd see the menace in her eyes, and then in time, I got over it. They feel like orange peels and are amazing to watch. I'd feed her, and love her, and take her everywhere. I miss her!

I think you get the idea, the point is everything in life is scary the first time we do it, but that's only because we make it scary. We don't know what to expect and our minds are good at thinking the worst so everything is more exaggerated than it has to be. That can be fun at a Halloween Festival but can slow your progress if you're shooting Street. The key here, like with anything, is to act as if you belong. I have another story there, but the point is to put aside your fears, put yourself on assignment, and get the job done. The technicals of a short lens can make it easier, and you can even fake that your looking at your LCD screen if you want.

The doing is the easy part, the making a great shot, well that's another story entirely. I hope this helps! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:10 am

Thanks, Steve, but the fact is that I am very content with what I shoot and really have no strong desire to get "good at street." I have great respect for photographers who can do it and do it well, and I expect I could probably do it well except that, shyness aside, I just don't have the desire. But thanks! (OK)
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
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All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Post by St3v3M » Tue Oct 24, 2017 3:00 am

Charles Haacker wrote:... I just don't have the desire. But thanks! (OK)

And there's the crux of it. At this point desire is everything. Excellent! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by St3v3M » Mon Dec 04, 2017 6:46 pm

I came across this and thought it would interesting to develop into a post of its own. S-
- To Symmetry Or Not To Symmetry - That Is The Discussion
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Post by minniev » Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:25 am

St3v3M wrote:I came across this and thought it would interesting to develop into a post of its own. S-
- To Symmetry Or Not To Symmetry - That Is The Discussion


This was of interest to me because of my own preoccupation with geometric shapes and lines in images. While I have never had a class about the concept of dynamic symmetry, I am drawn, in my ignorance, to geometrical form in my own images and the images of others. Show me a composition with a bunch of identifiable shapes arranged in a pleasing manner and I'm usually gonna think it is a good image. I shuffle forms in my head when I shoot and work with them further in post via processing and cropping.

Though the article linked is about Cartier Bresson, some of the concepts apply to this month's Master's too - re: William Eggleston, who uses form very purposefully alongside color to build his rather peculiar compositions.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by St3v3M » Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:35 am

minniev wrote:This was of interest to me because of my own preoccupation with geometric shapes and lines in images. ...

We are an odd sort that finds comfort in the identifiable but also likes it when we color outside the lines. I'm glad you enjoyed this! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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