Welcome new members. If you have been recently invited to join our forum, welcome.
Please take a few minutes to introduce yourself at The Meeting / Room General Discussions / Introduce yourself
"He who knows most knows how little he knows." -Thomas Jefferson

― Artistic Expression Showcase'T. R. Pugh Memorial Park' (composite)

Post Reply
User avatar
davechinn
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1892
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2014 3:01 pm
Location: Ky
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

'T. R. Pugh Memorial Park' (composite)

Post by davechinn » Wed Jun 12, 2019 1:17 pm

While traveling to Houston for a visit with my son & family we stopped in Little Rock, Arkansas for the evening with plans to explore this little fairyland the next morning. After our visit to Houston and home again is when I decided an attempt to make this composite, by placing my rambunctious, almost 4 year old granddaughter in one of the gristmill images I took. Both her and the mill were taken under very different lighting conditions, so it can be difficult (for me) to determine the alignment of the two conditions. Thoughts and suggestions would be helpful to my eyes. Posted are the originals and composite for comparison.

Interesting info from Wikipedia: T. R. Pugh Memorial Park (or The Old Mill) is a re-creation of an 1880s era water-powered grist mill located in North Little Rock, Arkansas. It was used in the opening scenes of the movie classic Gone With The Wind. In 2010, the site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The park was built in 1933 by Justin Matthews and named in honor of Thomas R. Pugh, of Portland, Arkansas, who was a close friend and benefactor of Matthews. The architect for the park and the mill was Frank Carmean with artist Dionicio Rodriguez serving as sculptor of the concrete work to simulate wooden, iron, and steel structures.[2]

In present day, due to its picturesque views, the Old Mill serves as the backdrop for weddings and portrait photography.[3]

In 2008, the roof was set on fire, but no permanent damage resulted.[4]

Note, I just realized that I posted this in the showcase but had intentions to post in the Artistic Expression Critique. Sorry for my mistake. Critique away !!!
Attachments
Grist Mill DEC_1578w.jpg
Dalilah DEC_1728w.jpg
Dalilah DEC_1578w.jpg
https://www.davechinn.com/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/35722922@N02/albums

Don’t shoot what it looks like. Shoot what it feels like.
David Alan Harvey

User avatar
minniev
Mentoris Supremus
Mentoris Supremus
Posts: 5090
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 3:55 am
Location: Mississippi
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by minniev » Wed Jun 12, 2019 3:45 pm

Thanks for sharing this well managed composite. Using photos that are composed and angled so similarly was a smart move. You actually moved the shadow with her! Did you select it with the original selection or select it separately? I saw a video recently about a special technique for selecting shadows, and wondered if that’s what you did here. I haven’t tried it yet.

The Chinn Soft Focus approach works well with this adorable model.

BTW, I know this place! Ran across it during a trip through Little Rock, and found it very photogenic. While I was there I met a man in his 90s who was trying to take pictures with an ancient point and shoot and not having much luck, so I asked him if he’d like me to send him some of mine. It was his wife’s favorite place and she had passed away. He had the idea to submit an application to have it placed on a postal stamp, so I helped him with the effort. We were not successful in the end, but made it through one round of the selection process which took two years. It was pretty interesting. I had never thought how decisions were made about what goes onto stamps.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

User avatar
rmalarz
Mentoris Sextus
Mentoris Sextus
Posts: 622
Joined: Mon Jun 19, 2017 2:28 pm
Location: Arizona
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Post by rmalarz » Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:01 pm

Very nice work, Dave.
--Bob
There is no CTRL-Z in the wet.
Lifetime member Royal Photographic Society

User avatar
davechinn
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1892
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2014 3:01 pm
Location: Ky
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Post by davechinn » Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:28 pm

minniev wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 3:45 pm
Thanks for sharing this well managed composite. Using photos that are composed and angled so similarly was a smart move. You actually moved the shadow with her! Did you select it with the original selection or select it separately? I saw a video recently about a special technique for selecting shadows, and wondered if that’s what you did here. I haven’t tried it yet.

The Chinn Soft Focus approach works well with this adorable model.

BTW, I know this place! Ran across it during a trip through Little Rock, and found it very photogenic. While I was there I met a man in his 90s who was trying to take pictures with an ancient point and shoot and not having much luck, so I asked him if he’d like me to send him some of mine. It was his wife’s favorite place and she had passed away. He had the idea to submit an application to have it placed on a postal stamp, so I helped him with the effort. We were not successful in the end, but made it through one round of the selection process which took two years. It was pretty interesting. I had never thought how decisions were made about what goes onto stamps.


Thanks Minnie !!! Most times I'll have difficulty with light direction and matching subject contrast to my chosen background. Altho, I will admit, I have improved, but still have a long way to go. Yes, I selected the shadow along with her. That made it so much easier for me rather than trying to create them. The shadow seemed to flow well so I decided to move forward. Next time probably won't be so easy. There are so many YouTube & Photoshop tutorials on the subject of creating shadows. I have seen and used a couple of them. I did just recently viewed a new one the other day and thought maybe that was the one you saw. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4YVE1NPEfg

The soft focus seems to be working very well, if I don't over do it, which I'm guilty of, but observation is a key component, isn't it?

It doesn't surprise me that you have made a visit to this wonder land. You seem to be many steps ahead of me with visiting locations. Your story to share your photos with the man in his 90's is interesting. Bureaucracy seems to get in the way of most decisions, even with stamps I suppose.

While we were there I had a unique encounter by meeting a fellow hoger and can't remember his name at the moment. He also was also a fellow sailor on a similar ship stationed on the same cruise/location I was on back in the early 70's. We may have crossed paths in some of the wild port visitations back then. We talked for a long while, which made my visit more enjoyable. Timing in a small world !!!

Also, here is the link to the opening of Gone With the Wind that shows the grist mill. It comes in at 1:31 only for a few seconds. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pL2yPFxBQQ4
https://www.davechinn.com/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/35722922@N02/albums

Don’t shoot what it looks like. Shoot what it feels like.
David Alan Harvey

User avatar
davechinn
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1892
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2014 3:01 pm
Location: Ky
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Post by davechinn » Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:30 pm

rmalarz wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:01 pm
Very nice work, Dave.
--Bob

Thanks Bob, much appreciated !!!
Dave
https://www.davechinn.com/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/35722922@N02/albums

Don’t shoot what it looks like. Shoot what it feels like.
David Alan Harvey

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest