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Member's ShowcaseSculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

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- Abstract, collages, still life, digital or analog manipulations... Whatever doesn't fit in another category.
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Charles Haacker
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Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby Charles Haacker » Fri Aug 18, 2017 3:04 pm

These seem not to fit well anywhere else, but I think these will be the last of my Lauritzen group. Many of you know that I am pretty eclectic, photographing whatever interests me, whatever passes in front of my lens. At my age I admit I tend to photograph a lot from my own eye level (I am six feet) because I'm in rotten shape. I have a lot of trouble getting down, and even more trouble getting back up, and that's not meant to be funny because it isn't, and I could do something about it if I wanted, but at present I do not.

I found a half dozen sculptures (one is a frieze) inside the Lauritzen conservatory:
Attachments
DSC07634.EMlr.jpg
Whimsical Elephant Fountain
Sony DSC-RX10, ƒ/5.6 10.1 mm 1/200 ISO 125
DSC07636.EMlr.jpg
"Barnyard Gossips" by Dan Ostermiller.
When two cats have their ears laid back like that, anyone who knows cats knows exactly what's going on. The outstretched paw is a challenge, too. The other cat may or may not smack it down, but they can sit for hours yowling trash talk at each other.
Sony DSC-RX10, ƒ/5.6 10.9 mm 1/50 ISO 125
DSC07641.EMlr.jpg
Frieze of Ammon-Ra (for some strange reason)
The Egyptian god Ammon-Ra was depicted with ram horns. ... The horns of Ammon may have also represented the East and West of the Earth, and one of the titles of Ammon was "the two-horned." There was nothing to indicate where this came from or why. I decided to retain the two globes below for balance.
Sony DSC-RX10, ƒ/5.6 11.1 mm 1/100 ISO 125
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Charles Haacker
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Re: Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby Charles Haacker » Fri Aug 18, 2017 3:08 pm

The final three:
Attachments
DSC07642.EMlr.jpg
Le Coq Gauloise
Almost as important a national symbol to the French as Marianne. This is one of those vanishingly rare pictures where I popped the peanut flash to provide a little fill since it was strongly backlit from the window.
Sony DSC-RX10, ƒ/4.0 30.8 mm 1/800 ISO 125
DSC07643.EMlr.jpg
Lion Fountain (no information found)
Sony DSC-RX10, ƒ/5.6 30.8 mm 1/200 ISO 125
DSC07644.EMlr.jpg
Detail, Lion Fountain
Sony DSC-RX10, ƒ/5.6 22.9 mm 1/160 ISO 125
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All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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minniev
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Re: Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby minniev » Fri Aug 18, 2017 7:14 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:These seem not to fit well anywhere else, but I think these will be the last of my Lauritzen group. Many of you know that I am pretty eclectic, photographing whatever interests me, whatever passes in front of my lens. At my age I admit I tend to photograph a lot from my own eye level (I am six feet) because I'm in rotten shape. I have a lot of trouble getting down, and even more trouble getting back up, and that's not meant to be funny because it isn't, and I could do something about it if I wanted, but at present I do not.

I found a half dozen sculptures (one is a frieze) inside the Lauritzen conservatory:


Nice collection. I hear ya about getting down and back up. (It used to be so EASY). I still scramble on the ground a bit but it is embarrassing sometimes to try and get out of the predicaments I get into.

Nice captures of the sculptures and their surrounding greenery even in the bright light.

I bet you can use these into something else besides your travel album with crops, other finagling in PS, conversions to monochrome, and sundry other tricks. This is a set you need to keep on hand for when you want to play. I see a ton of potential.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Charles Haacker
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Re: Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby Charles Haacker » Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:09 am

minniev wrote:Nice collection. I hear ya about getting down and back up. (It used to be so EASY). I still scramble on the ground a bit but it is embarrassing sometimes to try and get out of the predicaments I get into.

Nice captures of the sculptures and their surrounding greenery even in the bright light.

I bet you can use these into something else besides your travel album with crops, other finagling in PS, conversions to monochrome, and sundry other tricks. This is a set you need to keep on hand for when you want to play. I see a ton of potential.

Thanks, Min. :|
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Re: Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby PietFrancke » Sat Aug 19, 2017 1:16 pm

cool stuff - like the back stories that go with them. The lion as a sculpture produces dissonance to me as I can't wrap my head around it as a fountain. I know it is a traditional theme and all, but water spewing from the mouth just doesn't cut it for some reason.. Love those cats.

Matt Quinn
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Re: Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby Matt Quinn » Sat Aug 19, 2017 5:19 pm

Waterlillies after rain (1 of 1).jpg
Charles, I join your groaning about knees, hips and back; several surgeries later, I set off bells when passing through metal detectors. And I feel you have give me permission to take photos of what captures my eye, in spite of the constant advice a photographer friend has given to be more selective. My response to him has been that I am selective; I have selected all the photos I have taken.

Following up on the Reeds and Lillies discussion, here's an attempt at a rework of the three Mallards photo (below) and a shot from this morning (above) after a torrential downpour last night. Thanks for your interest. Matt
Three mallards 2 (1 of 1).jpg
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Charles Haacker
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Re: Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby Charles Haacker » Sat Aug 19, 2017 11:39 pm

PietFrancke wrote:cool stuff - like the back stories that go with them. The lion as a sculpture produces dissonance to me as I can't wrap my head around it as a fountain. I know it is a traditional theme and all, but water spewing from the mouth just doesn't cut it for some reason.. Love those cats.

Thanks, Piet. I looked all over for a plaque to identify that lion fountain but could not find one. I totally agree about the utter incongruity of a lion spitting water endlessly into a pool. The elephant at least makes a little more sense. Not a lot, but some.

I love those cats, too. My mother had cats and I was intimately familiar with that nose-to-nose-flattened-ears pose while they sang rude epithets to one another. :D
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Charles Haacker
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Re: Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby Charles Haacker » Sun Aug 20, 2017 12:13 am

Matt Quinn wrote:Charles, I join your groaning about knees, hips and back; several surgeries later, I set off bells when passing through metal detectors. And I feel you have give me permission to take photos of what captures my eye, in spite of the constant advice a photographer friend has given to be more selective. My response to him has been that I am selective; I have selected all the photos I have taken.

Following up on the Reeds and Lillies discussion, here's an attempt at a rework of the three Mallards photo (below) and a shot from this morning (above) after a torrential downpour last night. Thanks for your interest.

Well, dawn breaks. Your Leica M is a monocrom! It delivers DNG's (raw, full data) strictly in B&W. It's an extraordinary tool for teaching one to "see" in B&W! Graham Smith uses a Leica for a lot of his street work, most of which is B&W, but I'm not sure if it's the monochrom version (and anyway he also uses a Nikon). I know he likes the Leica for street because of its quiet discretion. I think it requires great discipline to go out knowing you're loaded with B&W and no color in the bag, so to speak. I flat couldn't do it anymore! :D

I like that first water-lilies shot! It has a defined center of interest and I love the ripples and reflections. The second one still doesn't do it for me, but I cannot tell you why, except perhaps that's it's "busy" and seems lacking in a center of interest. On the other hand, no one needs to give you permission to shoot whatever catches your eye, as the glow of sun on reeds did for you. One of the things I love best about digital is that there's virtually no restriction. If you have enough cards you can't run out of "film" (but carry extra batteries). Aside from the costs already incurred for equipment there's essentially no cost for "film and processing" until you print something. There's no reason not to explore a subject, different angles, walk around it, whatever you want. I'm sure I always overshoot, but for me the selectivity comes in when I upload the card to Lightroom and begin to edit.

I am sorry about your pains and painful surgeries! I have thus far escaped that (I'm 75) but my wife died last year and I'm still coping, which should mean getting out and walking and photographing but... :oops:
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

Matt Quinn
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Re: Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby Matt Quinn » Sun Aug 20, 2017 2:48 am

Charles Haacker wrote:
Matt Quinn wrote:Charles, I join your groaning about knees, hips and back; several surgeries later, I set off bells when passing through metal detectors. And I feel you have give me permission to take photos of what captures my eye, in spite of the constant advice a photographer friend has given to be more selective. My response to him has been that I am selective; I have selected all the photos I have taken.

Following up on the Reeds and Lillies discussion, here's an attempt at a rework of the three Mallards photo (below) and a shot from this morning (above) after a torrential downpour last night. Thanks for your interest.

Well, dawn breaks. Your Leica M is a monocrom! It delivers DNG's (raw, full data) strictly in B&W. It's an extraordinary tool for teaching one to "see" in B&W! Graham Smith uses a Leica for a lot of his street work, most of which is B&W, but I'm not sure if it's the monochrom version (and anyway he also uses a Nikon). I know he likes the Leica for street because of its quiet discretion. I think it requires great discipline to go out knowing you're loaded with B&W and no color in the bag, so to speak. I flat couldn't do it anymore! :D

I like that first water-lilies shot! It has a defined center of interest and I love the ripples and reflections. The second one still doesn't do it for me, but I cannot tell you why, except perhaps that's it's "busy" and seems lacking in a center of interest. On the other hand, no one needs to give you permission to shoot whatever catches your eye, as the glow of sun on reeds did for you. One of the things I love best about digital is that there's virtually no restriction. If you have enough cards you can't run out of "film" (but carry extra batteries). Aside from the costs already incurred for equipment there's essentially no cost for "film and processing" until you print something. There's no reason not to explore a subject, different angles, walk around it, whatever you want. I'm sure I always overshoot, but for me the selectivity comes in when I upload the card to Lightroom and begin to edit.

I am sorry about your pains and painful surgeries! I have thus far escaped that (I'm 75) but my wife died last year and I'm still coping, which should mean getting out and walking and photographing but... :oops:


Charles, I am sad to hear you lost you wife. My wife and I will celebrate our 50th next summer; I can't remember a time I wasn't married or wasn't with her. I don't think I could cope if I lost her.

I was in great shape until 75; that was a bump in the road, for some mysterious reason. The parts began to disassemble, back, hip, ankles. I am 82 and don't even try to kneel, much less try a pushup. The surgeries on back and hip were done at Mass General in Boston and are marvels; the tibial tendons, done at a local hospital in VA, are a menace still. I have to think consciously about walking and climbing stairs else I'll trip. A friend I used to work with told me her father, a retired lawyer in AZ, had a regular meeting of the ROMEOs (Retired Old Men Eating Out) every Thursday at a local restaurant for an organ recital -- heart, lungs, prostate, etc. Never thought I would get here, but here I am.

I have some other shots of the Herring Run from this morning that I will look at tomorrow to see whether any deserves posting. Thanks for your mentoring. Walking is good. Walking with a camera is better. Matt
Matt Quinn

"One should really use the camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind." Dorothea Lange

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Charles Haacker
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Re: Sculptures, Omaha's Lauritzen Gardens

Postby Charles Haacker » Sun Aug 20, 2017 7:48 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:Charles, I am sad to hear you lost you wife. My wife and I will celebrate our 50th next summer; I can't remember a time I wasn't married or wasn't with her. I don't think I could cope if I lost her.

I was in great shape until 75; that was a bump in the road, for some mysterious reason. The parts began to disassemble, back, hip, ankles. I am 82 and don't even try to kneel, much less try a pushup. The surgeries on back and hip were done at Mass General in Boston and are marvels; the tibial tendons, done at a local hospital in VA, are a menace still. I have to think consciously about walking and climbing stairs else I'll trip. A friend I used to work with told me her father, a retired lawyer in AZ, had a regular meeting of the ROMEOs (Retired Old Men Eating Out) every Thursday at a local restaurant for an organ recital -- heart, lungs, prostate, etc. Never thought I would get here, but here I am.

I have some other shots of the Herring Run from this morning that I will look at tomorrow to see whether any deserves posting. Thanks for your mentoring. Walking is good. Walking with a camera is better. Matt

Thank you, Matt. I was hoping we would make 50, but we did make 46. I really do sympathize with what you are/have gone through! But I have to admit that organ recital is funny!
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|


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