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General DiscussionsCrazy Winter weather on the East Coast

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Duck
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Re: Crazy Winter weather on the East Coast

Post by Duck » Thu Jan 04, 2018 9:30 pm

You'd think by now I'd get used to it. Nope. I'm hibernating right now. I'm even procrastinating going out to snow blow the driveway.

However, I just took my wife to work (she works part time at the local supermarket) in my Jeep and I was having fun. :yay:

On a side note... :(

The streaming strength on my home network is poor so I won't be able to do a video workshop as I wanted. The best it can handle is voice.

Time to contact the local service provider and complain.
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Post by minniev » Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:55 pm

Duck wrote:
Thu Jan 04, 2018 5:14 pm
Thought I'd share this image out my back window across to the neighbor's yard and beyond (that's his shed). Shot wide so distances look further out. According to the news reporters this is just the start. We're getting whipping gusts and the occasional whiteout.

Unitas_Photography-Blizzard_2018.jpg
Yikes, looks impressively cold. We are still having unusually cold temps, but it got into the 30's today, so that's an improvement. Stay safe!
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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Fri Jan 05, 2018 11:28 am

Not to get political or nuthin', but remember Dorothy? "There's no place like home... There's no place like home... There's no place like home..."
There is no climate change... There is no climate change... There is no climate change... :lol:

(I think it will be 50 years or more before climatologists can look back and determine when the tipping point was, but as a compleat just-barely-eddicated fella I think we are at the tipping point now. Right now. And I am not blaming us Yumans, although I personally cannot imagine that 7.5+ billion yumans and counting, all stomping our tiny carbon feetprints around have "little impact;" to me that makes no sense. But it doesn't actually matter a lot; the fact is that the climate is changing owing to many, many factors, most probably beyond our control whether we started it or not, and we must not conflate climate with weather. I think the evidence is strong that the climate is warming, and the increasing power of storms (weather) is evidence of specifically ocean warming, which is a major driver of weather. Wet places will become dry and dry wet. Food supplies will be disrupted, et cetera so on yada. I also think we will adapt. We always have, so we'll manage in the long run, but I believe we are staring down the barrel of our New Normal right this minute.)
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Post by Duck » Fri Jan 05, 2018 6:03 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Fri Jan 05, 2018 11:28 am
[...]
(I think it will be 50 years or more before climatologists can look back and determine when the tipping point was [...]
I blame humans. We are doing harm to the planet and not thinking twice about it. I know that at one point Mother Nature will shudder her shoulders and reduce the population of parasites on her back. :x

I won't see it, but it will happen. Nature has a way of balancing itself out.

Now back to our regularly scheduled programing...
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Post by PietFrancke » Fri Jan 05, 2018 7:20 pm

Duck wrote:
Fri Jan 05, 2018 6:03 pm
Charles Haacker wrote:
Fri Jan 05, 2018 11:28 am
[...]
(I think it will be 50 years or more before climatologists can look back and determine when the tipping point was [...]
I blame humans. We are doing harm to the planet and not thinking twice about it. I know that at one point Mother Nature will shudder her shoulders and reduce the population of parasites on her back. :x

I won't see it, but it will happen. Nature has a way of balancing itself out.

Now back to our regularly scheduled programing...
I completely agree - I blame the Greed of Humans. Duck's cousin Donald is a nice example of seeing what you want to see. Of all of humanities issues, Ego, Blindness, and Stupidity are high on the list. We will ultimately all pay for these errors and shortcomings, but it pains me in the extreme that we are taking the animals with us - or rather, putting them first in line.

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Post by Charles Haacker » Sat Jan 06, 2018 2:10 am

Duck wrote:
Fri Jan 05, 2018 6:03 pm
Charles Haacker wrote:
Fri Jan 05, 2018 11:28 am
[...]
(I think it will be 50 years or more before climatologists can look back and determine when the tipping point was [...]
I blame humans. We are doing harm to the planet and not thinking twice about it. I know that at one point Mother Nature will shudder her shoulders and reduce the population of parasites on her back. :x

I won't see it, but it will happen. Nature has a way of balancing itself out.

Now back to our regularly scheduled programing...
PietFrancke wrote:
Fri Jan 05, 2018 7:20 pm
I completely agree - I blame the Greed of Humans. Duck's cousin Donald is a nice example of seeing what you want to see. Of all of humanities issues, Ego, Blindness, and Stupidity are high on the list. We will ultimately all pay for these errors and shortcomings, but it pains me in the extreme that we are taking the animals with us - or rather, putting them first in line.
(Duck, if you think this discussion is inappropriate for our photographic forum please delete it):
I completely agree with you both but I didn't want to lay all the blame on humanity because I don't think it's true. I am no scientist but I have had just enough scientific training to make me dangerous, and my Kidz are both scientists (Erin is now DOCTOR Erin (hydrogeology) so Bow Down Ye Mortals!). I have long thought that it makes absolutely no sense to argue that humans have NO impact. That's just silly. Stupid. Short-sighted. Selfish. It's like when you stole the cookie; the crumbs were still on your chin when you insisted "I didn't do it!" You may even have convinced yourself you didn't do it, but you can't fool Mother.

When I was in college in the SF Bay Area I minored in anthropology. Captain Juan Gaspar de Portolá trekking overland from the south could not see San Francisco Bay for the smoke of the fires of the natives! SF is in a bowl and inversions keep the pollutants in right to this day and the natives were ignoring government regulations requiring the use of stack scrubbers and catalytic converters so they were fouling their own nest. The point our instructors were trying to make is that humans have impact on their environment (Duh). It makes absolutely no difference what our intent is or how smart we think we are. I think it's arguable that it's true of all critters, especially animals (and we are most emphatically animals, folks; hairless apes*). Daphne and I would discuss this on long road trips and eventually remark, "Everything that liveth, poopeth." All living organisms need nutrients and discharge waste products. I don't think you need a tremendous amount of imagination to recognize the 7.5 BILLION humans (7,500,000,000) MUST have a profound impact on their environment. The deniers claiming "I didn't do it" have crumbs on their lips. How could that many organisms not have an impact? It's ludicrous. Get real.

I think basically that people who care are willing to accept some sacrifice now to try to forestall a bigger sacrifice later. Britain is just now imposing some kind of "latte tax" on disposable cups. Most of the time I don't use coffee shops, but if I do I always have my nice big stainless bombproof Thermos car cup. They even give me a discount for using it. Drop in the bucket? Sure, but enough drops will fill the bucket. I suspect a lot of the challenge is overcoming laziness; we like and are used to our creature comforts, like disposable cups, plastic grocery bags, plastics period...

But the evidence is that we can't possibly be responsible for all the bad stuff since we simply haven't been here long enough. Duck, you are I fear correct: Mother takes care of it because Mother does. not. care. Adapt! Or die! The evidence is that there have been 5 major extinctions since life started, wiping out (WIPING out) up to 95% of everything living at the time. The last one was only (only) about 65 million years ago and eliminated our biggest (literally in some cases) competitors so we evolved* to become the squishy little feisty wimpy dominant species (yay us). In our present form we yumans have only been here a coupl'a hundred thousand years, a heartbeat in geologic time* and remember, Mother. Does. Not. Care.* We can not possibly be totally responsible for everything bad because we weren't even here for the last five extinctions; we only just evolved.* We are and still should be mostly prey animals for other stuff. On the other hand, look at the diversity of life in the present day and ask yourself, having wiped away pretty much all life 5 times so far, there's plenty of life still. I think it is a uniquely human arrogance that we think we stand at the pinnacle of evolution.* it is estimated that there are some 10 quintillion (10,000,000,000,000,000,000) individual insects alive. In the United States alone, the number of described species is approximately 91,000. This kind of stat makes me think, Who in the hell do we think we are?! We do have a couple of things going for us as a species: big brains; aggression; and supreme adaptability. Humans can figure out how to stay alive literally anywhere (space, ocean bottom, anywhere). Humans might just survive a big extinction, but indeed Piet, precisely because we have the big brains we have (I believe anyway) a responsibility to try to bring along as many others as possible. The science currently predicts that major changes are coming. We will lose pretty much all of Florida. To save almost all of our major ports will cost, I dunno, what's bigger than a $googolplex? I don't think it's a matter of save so much as move, but how far back, and the cost is the same. Places that used to be dry will be wet. Wet places will turn dry. Animals that cannot adapt to rapid and profound changes in nutrients will die. The blunt fact is that they would whether it was our "fault" or not. Yumans had nothing to do with the last 5 mass extinctions. It wasn't us. But now, as the Big Brained Aggressive Adaptables, I agree that we have a moral responsibility to mitigate, but I also suspect that we just won't do it. It's like standing on the express track with your back to the train and your headphones in...

***** (If you are a young earth creationist that's fine; the evidence is against you but I will not rise to an argument.)
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(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Post by St3v3M » Sat Jan 06, 2018 2:28 am

It's Going to Be -100 Degrees on Mount Washington Tonight. Here's What That Feels Like
"You can get frostbite in just 30 seconds."

Please stay warm! S-
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Post by PietFrancke » Sat Jan 06, 2018 9:55 pm

Chuck, I think you are right about this all being an issue of morality. Whether individually, but also it must especially be there in our leadership. Technology can solve all our problems, but we have to figure out what we want. For example, do we double our world population again? Ultimately it is a matter of income redistribution, who gets what for doing what... One tiny bit of technology called bitcoin produced perhaps 200 Billionaires. Who has What and Why they have that What is changing...

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Post by Duck » Sat Jan 06, 2018 10:11 pm

I see the problems we face as collective. Individually we can not make any kind of significant dent in our situation. It's a bandaid on a severed limb. For example, what's a better solution; recycling those cheap grocery plastic bags that are polluting our oceans or just don't manufacture them any more? After all, there are so many better solutions already available, from compostable paper to reusable cloth bags. Common sense says one thing but corporate and economic politics and greed say another. My decision to "Go Green" does not change the fact that millions of plastic bags are still polluting our waters.
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Post by PietFrancke » Sat Jan 06, 2018 10:36 pm

Duck wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 10:11 pm
I see the problems we face as collective. Individually we can not make any kind of significant dent in our situation. It's a bandaid on a severed limb. For example, what's a better solution; recycling those cheap grocery plastic bags that are polluting our oceans or just don't manufacture them any more? After all, there are so many better solutions already available, from compostable paper to reusable cloth bags. Common sense says one thing but corporate and economic politics and greed say another. My decision to "Go Green" does not change the fact that millions of plastic bags are still polluting our waters.
exactly right.. We (humans) are an eating machine that knows no bounds. Our number one goal individually or collectively is to collect and consume. We compete to gather it all up. If our goal does not change, then we will simply be parasites that eat the host until there is no host left to eat. We can be whatever we wish - I am fearful that we only wish to eat, eat, eat.

We have to figure out a way to reward a more proper behavior...

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