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Open ChallengesCarlson's Guide to Landscape Painting

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PietFrancke
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Re: Carlson's Guide to Landscape Painting

Post by PietFrancke »

minniev wrote:
Fri Oct 02, 2020 1:45 am
PietFrancke wrote:
Thu Oct 01, 2020 12:40 am
minniev wrote:
Wed Sep 30, 2020 11:42 pm
I’ve ordered the book and am interested in how it comes i to play with photography!
awesome, we will play with trees and hills and clouds and figure out how some of that stuff works.
I don't have the book, and I know this is a rough approximation but I used your idea to fiddle with this thing that involves some sketching and Topazing and some painting and some texture. This treatment made Mt Katahdin as flat as a pancake because the setting sun was opposite it, and the lack of shadow got it turnt to mush once the detail was lowered. So I rough-painted some slopes and shadows on a layer, blending it, lowered opacity, and pushed the pixels around to get the second version. I know it needs more work, and I need more knowledge, but I can see the idea has merit.
hey, very nice. It is an interesting and fun image. Yeah, the rules would mostly apply when the light comes from over head in the dome.. Empty sky and sunlight behind us would make the 90 degree angles brighter than normal (which is as you have them). And the trees behind you would be darker, which is why your boats are so dark on the sides! I was thinking - the boat sides need to be brighter, and then I realized the boat sides were reflecting the trees behind us and to the sides of us, and those trees are dark!. The book says only snow is very bright (like the sky, perhaps even brighter some times), but Water is also very bright since it reflects the dome like a mirror. And your metal boats have a shiny top too. Perhaps with the light coming from behind us, the ground itself might be darker. And the 45 degree angles of the mountain (on the sides) might be darker.

Thank you for playing!

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Post by minniev »

PietFrancke wrote:
Fri Oct 02, 2020 2:42 am

hey, very nice. It is an interesting and fun image. Yeah, the rules would mostly apply when the light comes from over head in the dome.. Empty sky and sunlight behind us would make the 90 degree angles brighter than normal (which is as you have them). And the trees behind you would be darker, which is why your boats are so dark on the sides! I was thinking - the boat sides need to be brighter, and then I realized the boat sides were reflecting the trees behind us and to the sides of us, and those trees are dark!. The book says only snow is very bright (like the sky, perhaps even brighter some times), but Water is also very bright since it reflects the dome like a mirror. And your metal boats have a shiny top too. Perhaps with the light coming from behind us, the ground itself might be darker. And the 45 degree angles of the mountain (on the sides) might be darker.

Thank you for playing!
Sunlight was coming from behind and slightly to the left of where I was standing, which is in a depression beside a glacially formed lake. Everything where I was, from looking at the other pictures in the sequence, was in shade. I was waiting there for a supermoon to rise just after sunset. So the shadows on the sunlit face mountain were minimized anyway, and the Topaz process just obliterated them. Here I tried to add them back for definition, with checkered success. So I'm altering the light in a way, for the purpose of making the image more appealing. The boats were easy to paint, but the mountain defeated me!
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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PietFrancke
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Post by PietFrancke »

minniev wrote:
Fri Oct 02, 2020 3:22 pm
PietFrancke wrote:
Fri Oct 02, 2020 2:42 am

hey, very nice. It is an interesting and fun image. Yeah, the rules would mostly apply when the light comes from over head in the dome.. Empty sky and sunlight behind us would make the 90 degree angles brighter than normal (which is as you have them). And the trees behind you would be darker, which is why your boats are so dark on the sides! I was thinking - the boat sides need to be brighter, and then I realized the boat sides were reflecting the trees behind us and to the sides of us, and those trees are dark!. The book says only snow is very bright (like the sky, perhaps even brighter some times), but Water is also very bright since it reflects the dome like a mirror. And your metal boats have a shiny top too. Perhaps with the light coming from behind us, the ground itself might be darker. And the 45 degree angles of the mountain (on the sides) might be darker.

Thank you for playing!
Sunlight was coming from behind and slightly to the left of where I was standing, which is in a depression beside a glacially formed lake. Everything where I was, from looking at the other pictures in the sequence, was in shade. I was waiting there for a supermoon to rise just after sunset. So the shadows on the sunlit face mountain were minimized anyway, and the Topaz process just obliterated them. Here I tried to add them back for definition, with checkered success. So I'm altering the light in a way, for the purpose of making the image more appealing. The boats were easy to paint, but the mountain defeated me!
On the mountain, since the light is behind you, the faces that face away - the sides, might be darker. If ok, I want a quick play at that!

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Post by PietFrancke »

I ruined one of the pretty images in my Carlson book by drawing lines through it. I am going to try to paint this image with PS as a study in values (since I don't see values too good). It has 36 boxes, and this is more tedious than one might think. I keep doing way more detail than I probably should so it is going slowly.
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wintersceneBook.jpg

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minniev
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Post by minniev »

PietFrancke wrote:
Sun Oct 04, 2020 8:08 pm
minniev wrote:
Fri Oct 02, 2020 3:22 pm
PietFrancke wrote:
Fri Oct 02, 2020 2:42 am

hey, very nice. It is an interesting and fun image. Yeah, the rules would mostly apply when the light comes from over head in the dome.. Empty sky and sunlight behind us would make the 90 degree angles brighter than normal (which is as you have them). And the trees behind you would be darker, which is why your boats are so dark on the sides! I was thinking - the boat sides need to be brighter, and then I realized the boat sides were reflecting the trees behind us and to the sides of us, and those trees are dark!. The book says only snow is very bright (like the sky, perhaps even brighter some times), but Water is also very bright since it reflects the dome like a mirror. And your metal boats have a shiny top too. Perhaps with the light coming from behind us, the ground itself might be darker. And the 45 degree angles of the mountain (on the sides) might be darker.

Thank you for playing!
Sunlight was coming from behind and slightly to the left of where I was standing, which is in a depression beside a glacially formed lake. Everything where I was, from looking at the other pictures in the sequence, was in shade. I was waiting there for a supermoon to rise just after sunset. So the shadows on the sunlit face mountain were minimized anyway, and the Topaz process just obliterated them. Here I tried to add them back for definition, with checkered success. So I'm altering the light in a way, for the purpose of making the image more appealing. The boats were easy to paint, but the mountain defeated me!
On the mountain, since the light is behind you, the faces that face away - the sides, might be darker. If ok, I want a quick play at that!
You never have to ask permission for playing with my pictures, go right ahead, I like seeing what others do with them.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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PietFrancke
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Post by PietFrancke »

minniev wrote:
Mon Oct 05, 2020 12:23 am
PietFrancke wrote:
Sun Oct 04, 2020 8:08 pm
minniev wrote:
Fri Oct 02, 2020 3:22 pm


Sunlight was coming from behind and slightly to the left of where I was standing, which is in a depression beside a glacially formed lake. Everything where I was, from looking at the other pictures in the sequence, was in shade. I was waiting there for a supermoon to rise just after sunset. So the shadows on the sunlit face mountain were minimized anyway, and the Topaz process just obliterated them. Here I tried to add them back for definition, with checkered success. So I'm altering the light in a way, for the purpose of making the image more appealing. The boats were easy to paint, but the mountain defeated me!
On the mountain, since the light is behind you, the faces that face away - the sides, might be darker. If ok, I want a quick play at that!
You never have to ask permission for playing with my pictures, go right ahead, I like seeing what others do with them.
thanks Paula, and now I don't want to anymore... for some reason the mountains are looking better to me, I don't know if my eyesight is failing, but I thought your second image looked much like the original with perhaps only subtle changes, but looking at it now, it looks much as I would have liked to see them. The mountains look good to my eye!!!

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Post by minniev »

PietFrancke wrote:
Mon Oct 05, 2020 1:21 am
minniev wrote:
Mon Oct 05, 2020 12:23 am
PietFrancke wrote:
Sun Oct 04, 2020 8:08 pm

On the mountain, since the light is behind you, the faces that face away - the sides, might be darker. If ok, I want a quick play at that!
You never have to ask permission for playing with my pictures, go right ahead, I like seeing what others do with them.
thanks Paula, and now I don't want to anymore... for some reason the mountains are looking better to me, I don't know if my eyesight is failing, but I thought your second image looked much like the original with perhaps only subtle changes, but looking at it now, it looks much as I would have liked to see them. The mountains look good to my eye!!!
I have my copy of the book now, and will begin to read a bit. Lead on!
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by uuglypher »

Hi, Piet,
Stimulated by this thread I finally dug out my old copy of Carlson - it was like a reunion of old friends. I had first studied Carlson back in the late 60s when I first got into doing pastel and watercolor and colored pencil landscapes in a period of about a decade that began about almost two decades into my continuous lifelong avocation of photography.
Looking through the old, familiar pages again after
forty-five or fifty years I recalled being grateful to Carlson for articulating -far more clearly and functionally - much about light and all devolving therefrom: image tonality, brightness (dynamic ) range, shading, and the patterns and ranges of proportions of landscape features and their roles in composition. I realized that I had absorbed, in a far less than explicitly articulate, semi-conscious manner, many of Carlson’s well-expressed and illustrated observations during my earlier two decades of photography - much of it, I should admit, was under my father’s skilled and gentle tutelage.
I shortly realized that my pastels and watercolors were strongly informed by my photography background.

I can recall that while studying Carlson thinking: “Yeah..that’s right”, and “...whaddaya know! Of course- that’s just the way it is” about observations that had become usefully - albeit subconsciously / absorbed and valued concepts via photography! It’s hard to imagine other photographers not experiencing the same epiphanies.

It is wonderful to be reacquainted with this old friend... and I’m thinking I know where those pastels and colored pencils are in the storage unit, although I am sure that was not your intent Piet, when you started this thread.

Maybe conscientious social isolation ain’t all bad!

Dave

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Post by PietFrancke »

uuglypher wrote:
Wed Oct 14, 2020 10:50 pm
Hi, Piet,
Stimulated by this thread I finally dug out my old copy of Carlson - it was like a reunion of old friends. I had first studied Carlson back in the late 60s when I first got into doing pastel and watercolor and colored pencil landscapes in a period of about a decade that began about almost two decades into my continuous lifelong avocation of photography.
Looking through the old, familiar pages again after
forty-five or fifty years I recalled being grateful to Carlson for articulating -far more clearly and functionally - much about light and all devolving therefrom: image tonality, brightness (dynamic ) range, shading, and the patterns and ranges of proportions of landscape features and their roles in composition. I realized that I had absorbed, in a far less than explicitly articulate, semi-conscious manner, many of Carlson’s well-expressed and illustrated observations during my earlier two decades of photography - much of it, I should admit, was under my father’s skilled and gentle tutelage.
I shortly realized that my pastels and watercolors were strongly informed by my photography background.

I can recall that while studying Carlson thinking: “Yeah..that’s right”, and “...whaddaya know! Of course- that’s just the way it is” about observations that had become usefully - albeit subconsciously / absorbed and valued concepts via photography! It’s hard to imagine other photographers not experiencing the same epiphanies.

It is wonderful to be reacquainted with this old friend... and I’m thinking I know where those pastels and colored pencils are in the storage unit, although I am sure that was not your intent Piet, when you started this thread.

Maybe conscientious social isolation ain’t all bad!

Dave
LOL, will post something more tonight. Methinks that the storage unit is the wrong place for your tools. I love Carlson's clarity of thought and expression. In a book written almost 100 years ago, and still on target! Anyway, I feel strongly that Carlson has much to offer to the photographer and to those folks seeking to use PS to enhance (or create) their images.

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Post by PietFrancke »

this is why I am me and Carlson is Carlson, but it never hurts to try right? Trying to see proper tones, failed horribly, but it was fun. Took a very tedious approach at first and then later realizing it would take months, just started to dash tones and splotches in - even without regard to the grid.
value.jpg

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