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Open ChallengesCelebrate What's Right!

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Matt Quinn
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Re: Celebrate What's Right!

Post by Matt Quinn » Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:55 pm

minniev wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:33 pm
Thankful for the privilege of having Easter dinner in the house my grandparents built in 1905, and that I've spend two years repairing. All my folks weren't there but every branch was represented, and the little boys had a weekend in the country jumping on hay bales, playing whiffleball. and climbing trees.
Great memories. Love the piglet salt & pepper shakers. Matt
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Post by minniev » Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:36 pm

Birds are a cause to celebrate for me...glad to see herons and egrets fishing in the Pearl this morning.
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Post by Matt Quinn » Wed Apr 04, 2018 9:58 pm

minniev wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:36 pm
Birds are a cause to celebrate for me...glad to see herons and egrets fishing in the Pearl this morning.
Elegant. Regal. Imperious. Glorious scene. Well done. Matt
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Post by minniev » Thu Apr 05, 2018 12:44 am

Matt Quinn wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 9:58 pm
minniev wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:36 pm
Birds are a cause to celebrate for me...glad to see herons and egrets fishing in the Pearl this morning.
Elegant. Regal. Imperious. Glorious scene. Well done. Matt
Thanks Matt. I have never before had one turn into the sun and look me in the eye like that, where I can see all his features. That bird-eye is a problem though and it doesn’t fix well like human red-eye or dog green-eye. It is from some kind of extra eyelid they have. I didn’t try to fix it, I just let it be what it is.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by minniev » Sat Apr 07, 2018 7:40 pm

Just a cup of coffee on a cold morning. (played with using textures and PS toys). This was my mother's favorite coffee cup. She was a cat person. Memories are to celebrate.
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Post by St3v3M » Sat Apr 07, 2018 7:53 pm

minniev wrote:
Sat Apr 07, 2018 7:40 pm
Just a cup of coffee on a cold morning. (played with using textures and PS toys). This was my mother's favorite coffee cup. She was a cat person. Memories are to celebrate.
Wonderful! S-
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Post by Matt Quinn » Sun Apr 08, 2018 7:04 pm

First, the story.

Our younger son, Michael, and his wife, Colette, spent several years in NH, living frugally while she studied for her Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry. They would treat themselves to a breakfast in Hanover on Sunday mornings and became regulars. They noticed another couple with the same schedule and soon became table-mates. The man, Yan, turned out to be the head designer for Simon Pearce glass. One thing led to another; Michael said that he and I love Scotch. As a graduation gift, he designed a Scotch glass, made 6, and broke the mold. Michael and Colette have two, I have two at our Cape house, and one her in MD. Yes, I BROKE one. So I handle this one very carefully.

The Scotch: The Balvenie was the one that got us into this costly habit about 15 years ago. (Michael has kept a Scotch diary with our reactions to each new bottle.) Single malt means that the whisky was distilled in Scotland in a single distillery using a pot still distillation, a mash of only malted barley, and matured in oak casks for at least three years and one day. Most are distilled longer. (A few years ago, when the master blender at The Balvenie was retiring after 50 years, the distillery sold bottlings from a single cask from his first year. $30,000 a bottle! I read that single shots were selling for $3000 at Las Vegas hotels.)

A distillery may have a thousand or more casks maturing at any time. The master blender will decide the time to do the bottling, using all or most of the casks. He will sample as they mature -- not a bad job, I imagine -- and note those of special interest since each cask has different characteristics. Some have been used prior for sherry and have a sweet overtone; others may have been used for bourbon,etc. The insides of the barrels have been charred to add more depth of flavor.

The first fills tend to be bitter and sharp, as we learned with this one. Single barrel means that the bottling came from only one cask; the bottles carry the number of the cask and the bottle and don't taste like any others in that vintage year. Each cask yields about 300 bottles. We got hooked on this aspect when we bought a bottle from Cask 248 (not a first fill) in a forgotten year. After we sampled it, we ran back to the store and bought the other two. All gone now.

We have moved on to others from different regions of Scotland, will have half a dozen bottles on the shelf at any one time and will sample depending on weather, mood or impulse. But we always come back home to The Balvenie. If you want to start, I recommend the sherry cask. And Ernst would suggest milk with it.

Matt
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Post by St3v3M » Sun Apr 08, 2018 7:37 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:
Sun Apr 08, 2018 7:04 pm
First, the story.

Our younger son, Michael, and his wife, Colette, spent several years in NH, living frugally while she studied for her Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry. They would treat themselves to a breakfast in Hanover on Sunday mornings and became regulars. They noticed another couple with the same schedule and soon became table-mates. The man, Yan, turned out to be the head designer for Simon Pearce glass. One thing led to another; Michael said that he and I love Scotch. As a graduation gift, he designed a Scotch glass, made 6, and broke the mold. Michael and Colette have two, I have two at our Cape house, and one her in MD. Yes, I BROKE one. So I handle this one very carefully.

The Scotch: The Balvenie was the one that got us into this costly habit about 15 years ago. (Michael has kept a Scotch diary with our reactions to each new bottle.) Single malt means that the whisky was distilled in Scotland in a single distillery using a pot still distillation, a mash of only malted barley, and matured in oak casks for at least three years and one day. Most are distilled longer. (A few years ago, when the master blender at The Balvenie was retiring after 50 years, the distillery sold bottlings from a single cask from his first year. $30,000 a bottle! I read that single shots were selling for $3000 at Las Vegas hotels.)

A distillery may have a thousand or more casks maturing at any time. The master blender will decide the time to do the bottling, using all or most of the casks. He will sample as they mature -- not a bad job, I imagine -- and note those of special interest since each cask has different characteristics. Some have been used prior for sherry and have a sweet overtone; others may have been used for bourbon,etc. The insides of the barrels have been charred to add more depth of flavor.

The first fills tend to be bitter and sharp, as we learned with this one. Single barrel means that the bottling came from only one cask; the bottles carry the number of the cask and the bottle and don't taste like any others in that vintage year. Each cask yields about 300 bottles. We got hooked on this aspect when we bought a bottle from Cask 248 (not a first fill) in a forgotten year. After we sampled it, we ran back to the store and bought the other two. All gone now.

We have moved on to others from different regions of Scotland, will have half a dozen bottles on the shelf at any one time and will sample depending on weather, mood or impulse. But we always come back home to The Balvenie. If you want to start, I recommend the sherry cask. And Ernst would suggest milk with it.

Matt
Love the story and am amazed at the glasses. Great image too! Thank you for sharing this! S-
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Post by Matt Quinn » Sun Apr 08, 2018 8:44 pm

St3v3M wrote:
Sun Apr 08, 2018 7:37 pm
Matt Quinn wrote:
Sun Apr 08, 2018 7:04 pm
First, the story.

Our younger son, Michael, and his wife, Colette, spent several years in NH, living frugally while she studied for her Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry. They would treat themselves to a breakfast in Hanover on Sunday mornings and became regulars. They noticed another couple with the same schedule and soon became table-mates. The man, Yan, turned out to be the head designer for Simon Pearce glass. One thing led to another; Michael said that he and I love Scotch. As a graduation gift, he designed a Scotch glass, made 6, and broke the mold. Michael and Colette have two, I have two at our Cape house, and one her in MD. Yes, I BROKE one. So I handle this one very carefully.

The Scotch: The Balvenie was the one that got us into this costly habit about 15 years ago. (Michael has kept a Scotch diary with our reactions to each new bottle.) Single malt means that the whisky was distilled in Scotland in a single distillery using a pot still distillation, a mash of only malted barley, and matured in oak casks for at least three years and one day. Most are distilled longer. (A few years ago, when the master blender at The Balvenie was retiring after 50 years, the distillery sold bottlings from a single cask from his first year. $30,000 a bottle! I read that single shots were selling for $3000 at Las Vegas hotels.)

A distillery may have a thousand or more casks maturing at any time. The master blender will decide the time to do the bottling, using all or most of the casks. He will sample as they mature -- not a bad job, I imagine -- and note those of special interest since each cask has different characteristics. Some have been used prior for sherry and have a sweet overtone; others may have been used for bourbon,etc. The insides of the barrels have been charred to add more depth of flavor.

The first fills tend to be bitter and sharp, as we learned with this one. Single barrel means that the bottling came from only one cask; the bottles carry the number of the cask and the bottle and don't taste like any others in that vintage year. Each cask yields about 300 bottles. We got hooked on this aspect when we bought a bottle from Cask 248 (not a first fill) in a forgotten year. After we sampled it, we ran back to the store and bought the other two. All gone now.

We have moved on to others from different regions of Scotland, will have half a dozen bottles on the shelf at any one time and will sample depending on weather, mood or impulse. But we always come back home to The Balvenie. If you want to start, I recommend the sherry cask. And Ernst would suggest milk with it.

Matt



Love the story and am amazed at the glasses. Great image too! Thank you for sharing this! S-
Thanks. I am amazed at the generosity of people we know only casually. Matt
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Post by minniev » Sun Apr 08, 2018 8:56 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:
Sun Apr 08, 2018 7:04 pm
First, the story.

...
Matt
Great story Matt, and all the more reason to memorialize the remaining glass before the inevitable happens... Nice photo with perfect processing with all that delicate detail. Though the very thought of Scotch makes me sneeze and shake my head like a wet dog, I can appreciate a good photo and a good story, along with a beautiful piece of unique glassware.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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