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Member's ShowcaseFeeding Time

Our feathered friends are found all around us. From the common to the exotic.
- Birds of any type in the wild or in captivity. Share your images, techniques and equipment choices.
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Ceropegia
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Feeding Time

Postby Ceropegia » Mon May 22, 2017 12:18 am

I was trying to get some photos of young egrets, herons, and cormorants at the rookery in town. I wasn't having much luck because the trees are now fully leafed out obscuring most nests. Then I saw a great blue heron land in the top of one of the tallest trees and realized it had a nest there. It proceeded to feed its two young that were almost as big is it was. I kept shooting until the parent flew away and happily decided to call it a day which is when I realized my camera was set on macro. Sure that the other parent would soon return with more food, I decided to wait so I could take more photos with a proper setting. About an hour later one of the parents returned, but it was down lower in the nest and I could not get as clear a view as I had earlier. But when I got home I discovered that most of the earlier shots turned out OK.
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Ceropegia
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Re: Feeding Time

Postby Ceropegia » Mon May 22, 2017 12:20 am

A few more
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minniev
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Re: Feeding Time

Postby minniev » Mon May 22, 2017 12:39 am

This is a worthy effort in which the birds and trees did not fully cooperate. You did your job! You got tack sharp images of a wonderful sight, and I'd be thrilled to have got these. Those beaks! those topknots! Thank you for sharing. I've never got to see such with my own eyes.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Ceropegia
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Re: Feeding Time

Postby Ceropegia » Mon May 22, 2017 1:01 pm

minniev wrote:This is a worthy effort in which the birds and trees did not fully cooperate. You did your job! You got tack sharp images of a wonderful sight, and I'd be thrilled to have got these. Those beaks! those topknots! Thank you for sharing. I've never got to see such with my own eyes.

Thanks! They were really too far away for me to see well with my own eyes, and not even close enough to see well with my binoculars, but fun to watch and shoot through my camera's view finder.

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LindaShorey
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Re: Feeding Time

Postby LindaShorey » Wed May 24, 2017 12:04 pm

Such an awesome experience! Fun photos too, and I know absolutely about critter subjects too far to see easily, but that super-zoom (mine an sx50) allows you to watch the action and often get great shots too.

I have only seen one great blue heron nest close enough to photograph. There were triplets when I shot them, but a week or two later, down to just two. They were so aggressive when the parent flew it, it was jaw-dropping drama to observe!
"What's important in a photograph and what isn't." http://photographylife.com/whats-import ... -what-isnt

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Ceropegia
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Re: Feeding Time

Postby Ceropegia » Thu May 25, 2017 12:15 pm

LindaShorey wrote:I have only seen one great blue heron nest close enough to photograph. There were triplets when I shot them, but a week or two later, down to just two. They were so aggressive when the parent flew it, it was jaw-dropping drama to observe!

You are right about that. I wondered how that parent managed to keep its eyes intact.


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