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People Critique'Expressions'

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davechinn
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'Expressions'

Post by davechinn » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:30 pm

Capturing a variety of expressions can be a challenge, especially with candid shots on the streets. Patience is the key, and while at times I have very little. The three posted of this gentleman is an example of just how an expression can change an individual's appearance. Now, you may say "all three are not flattering", or "I wouldn't have taken the picture to begin with". However, as most know that doing street photography, one has to take what they can get at the time, good or bad. Anyone have any thoughts on expressions or the three images posted? Then again, this just may be a bad example. Comments welcomed.
Attachments
Expressions DEC_8115w B&W.jpg
#1
Expressions DEC_8116w B&W.jpg
#2
Expressions DEC_8119w B&W.jpg
#3
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minniev
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Post by minniev » Tue Dec 12, 2017 9:37 pm

davechinn wrote:Capturing a variety of expressions can be a challenge, especially with candid shots on the streets. Patience is the key, and while at times I have very little. The three posted of this gentleman is an example of just how an expression can change an individual's appearance. Now, you may say "all three are not flattering", or "I wouldn't have taken the picture to begin with". However, as most know that doing street photography, one has to take what they can get at the time, good or bad. Anyone have any thoughts on expressions or the three images posted? Then again, this just may be a bad example. Comments welcomed.

I think this is a fine study of a gentleman whose life may have been less than kind to him. Yes I would have taken the photos, too. With a close up study like this, I'd have talked with him, as I know you did, heard some of his story, established a partnership so to speak. I don't think photography has to be flattering to be good. Some of the shots convey slightly different feelings, as his expression changes, and have slightly different impact. But taken as a whole, I get a melancholy feeling which is common when I photograph the folk of the street. I do not find this kind of photography depressing or offensive, and I know you don't either. I've seen how you work, and it's a very respectful approach. People are people, regardless of their "status" in life, and all lives tell valuable stories. Photographers are visual storytellers, and while this kind of storytelling is not for every photographer, those who do it well and do it with the right spirit, as you do, are providing something of value.
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Matt Quinn
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Post by Matt Quinn » Tue Dec 12, 2017 11:58 pm

davechinn wrote:Capturing a variety of expressions can be a challenge, especially with candid shots on the streets. Patience is the key, and while at times I have very little. The three posted of this gentleman is an example of just how an expression can change an individual's appearance. Now, you may say "all three are not flattering", or "I wouldn't have taken the picture to begin with". However, as most know that doing street photography, one has to take what they can get at the time, good or bad. Anyone have any thoughts on expressions or the three images posted? Then again, this just may be a bad example. Comments welcomed.


Gripping, real, authentic. Very well done. Each portrays a different emotion; resignation or recognition, wondering or reminiscing, and finally, remembering and recollecting. We are all so much alike. This man obviously has an active interior life, many memories, some regrets but not assigning any blame. Rich stuff you have here, Dave. Matt
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Post by St3v3M » Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:35 am

It's amazing how much we see of ourselves when looking at others, the good the bad, the helpful and hurtful, all the emotions that span the length of a life.

People are amazing subjects meant to be looked at and remembered and I really like first for the emotion you show here! S-
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Post by Psjunkie » Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:39 am

Of the three I find #2 the most impactful but prefer the sharpness of #1

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Post by davechinn » Sun Dec 31, 2017 5:38 pm

minniev wrote:
Tue Dec 12, 2017 9:37 pm
davechinn wrote:Capturing a variety of expressions can be a challenge, especially with candid shots on the streets. Patience is the key, and while at times I have very little. The three posted of this gentleman is an example of just how an expression can change an individual's appearance. Now, you may say "all three are not flattering", or "I wouldn't have taken the picture to begin with". However, as most know that doing street photography, one has to take what they can get at the time, good or bad. Anyone have any thoughts on expressions or the three images posted? Then again, this just may be a bad example. Comments welcomed.
I think this is a fine study of a gentleman whose life may have been less than kind to him. Yes I would have taken the photos, too. With a close up study like this, I'd have talked with him, as I know you did, heard some of his story, established a partnership so to speak. I don't think photography has to be flattering to be good. Some of the shots convey slightly different feelings, as his expression changes, and have slightly different impact. But taken as a whole, I get a melancholy feeling which is common when I photograph the folk of the street. I do not find this kind of photography depressing or offensive, and I know you don't either. I've seen how you work, and it's a very respectful approach. People are people, regardless of their "status" in life, and all lives tell valuable stories. Photographers are visual storytellers, and while this kind of storytelling is not for every photographer, those who do it well and do it with the right spirit, as you do, are providing something of value.

Minnie, viewing the images in comparison encourages me to take more of the same subject when ever possible, where in the past I have just taken a shot and moved on. Sadly, I did not engage with him and I do regret it now. These were taken during the Cincinnati Reds opening day parade as I was strolling along on a crowded sidewalk only to stop along the way to capture my interest. Then continue on my approximate 15-20 block walk to the stadium to capture more interesting street shots. This has become a tradition with me, as it's my 3rd year to challenge myself to this event. I don't have to worry about parking, because Sharon drops me off a couple of hours before the parade starts and picks me up at the stadium just prior to the end of the game. It's an all day event and I'm usually tuckered out by it's end and don't bother with any images until the next day.

Sometimes it's hard to stay focused and I need to work on the issue of engaging with my subjects, but get sidetracked with the variety. I'm sure you understand the scenario.

Your absolutely correct, this type of photography doesn't have to be flattering and in some cases the less flattering the better. In some sense it can be depressing, but we have to look beyond that and maybe try to raise awareness of the fact there are those less fortunate. Oh, I'm sure most are aware, but we lose sight if it's not brought to our attention again and again. Sorta like out of sight out of mind.
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Don’t shoot what it looks like. Shoot what it feels like.
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