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People Critique"Portrait of a Significant Mid-Westerner"

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Duck
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Re: "Portrait of a Significant Mid-Westerner"

Post by Duck » Mon Jun 26, 2017 11:01 pm

St3v3M wrote:If you don't mind me asking, can this effect be achieved through filters, such as filtering the blue with yellow or orange? I've always been curious.
What a wonderful image! S-

There are ways of 'faking' an IR image but true infrared photography records a different part of the light spectrum. For example, Some (not all) green in trees reflect more IR back than others (something to do with the chlorophyll properties of leaves or some such) and therefore records as a very light gray to white instead of the normal mid to darker grays we are used to seeing in a normal B&W conversion. Flowers do the same thing. Skies tend to be deeper grays and blacks than in a normal conversion also. Man made stuff tends to look about the same. It takes a little getting used to in order to pre-visualize an image in IR.

Hope this helps as a quickie answer. IR can be pretty involved, depending on how far down the rabbit hole you want to travel.
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St3v3M
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Post by St3v3M » Mon Jun 26, 2017 11:07 pm

Duck wrote:There are ways of 'faking' an IR image but true infrared photography records a different part of the light spectrum. For example, Some (not all) green in trees reflect more IR back than others (something to do with the chlorophyll properties of leaves or some such) and therefore records as a very light gray to white instead of the normal mid to darker grays we are used to seeing in a normal B&W conversion. Flowers do the same thing. Skies tend to be deeper grays and blacks than in a normal conversion also. Man made stuff tends to look about the same. It takes a little getting used to in order to pre-visualize an image in IR.

Hope this helps as a quickie answer. IR can be pretty involved, depending on how far down the rabbit hole you want to travel.

I love 'rabbit holes' but your explanation even more. Thank you for this! S-
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Post by uuglypher » Tue Jun 27, 2017 1:48 pm

Steve wrote:
"If you don't mind me asking, can this effect be achieved through filters, such as filtering the blue with yellow or orange? I've always been curious."

Hi, Steve,
This is an infra-red image and, as such, is the result of exposing the sensor ONLY to light of the near-infrared spectrum. All wavelengths of visible light have been blocked and only the near-infrared wavelengths have been passed by the R72 filter screwed on the lens. So the filters you mention would have no effect.
Most digital cameras have an IR-blocking filter in front of the sensor and it must be removed if you wish to use that camera for IR photography. The camera I use (Sony DSC-F828) allows that IR-blocking filter to be taken out of the optical path with a flip-ofa-switch.

Although there are various ways of atttempting to digitally "fake" the appearance of true IR imagery, the result are, to those accustomed to IR imagery, just pale, pathetic imitations of the real thing.

Dave

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Post by St3v3M » Tue Jun 27, 2017 4:22 pm

uuglypher wrote:Hi, Steve,
This is an infra-red image and, as such, is the result of exposing the sensor ONLY to light of the near-infrared spectrum. All wavelengths of visible light have been blocked and only the near-infrared wavelengths have been passed by the R72 filter screwed on the lens. So the filters you mention would have no effect.
Most digital cameras have an IR-blocking filter in front of the sensor and it must be removed if you wish to use that camera for IR photography. The camera I use (Sony DSC-F828) allows that IR-blocking filter to be taken out of the optical path with a flip-ofa-switch.

Although there are various ways of atttempting to digitally "fake" the appearance of true IR imagery, the result are, to those accustomed to IR imagery, just pale, pathetic imitations of the real thing.

Dave

So much to learn - so much fun doing it! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by uuglypher » Mon Jul 10, 2017 7:33 am

St3v3'

This is a different tack in addressing your question:
"If you don't mind me asking, can this effect be achieved through filters, such as filtering the blue with yellow or orange? I've always been curious."


If you are asking about real world filters..you know the kind...different densities and colors...each passing light of a particular set of characteristics relative to color (Hue), "richness" (saturation), and value/tone/brightness (Luminosity) then, yes, of course.
First you must assure that your digital camera's IR-blocking filter is removed from in front of the sensor, and that a filter blocking our normal visual wavelengths is in front of your lens.

If, on the other hand, you are referring to "digital filters" available in some image processing applications that are used to produce "faux infra-red " images, I've yet to see any that can mimic the effects of true infra red imagery.

Personally, as one who grew up in photosentive emulsion photography, filters were real' material "things"...sheets of colored glass or plastic, each varying in limiting transmission of certain colors of light, or of brightness of light ( neutral density filters) . To me , it is strange to refer to a digital control slider that proportionately darkens an image by digital means as a "variable neutral density filter"... or to call the "HSL" algorithm triad ( Hue, Saturation, Luminosity") a set of "filters"!!!???? Howzabout simply digital controls by which Red, Blue, and Green can individually be varied in hue, saturation, and value/tone/brightness?

Just opinion based on experience by which one's sense of color and color control developed.

I hope that helps.

Dave

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Post by St3v3M » Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:28 pm

uuglypher wrote:I hope that helps.

Dave

This does and I appreciate the help!

I tend to think In-Camera first, but am always amazed how much can be done In-Post. There's so much to learn and so much fun doing it! S-
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Post by rmalarz » Mon Jul 10, 2017 8:32 pm

Dave, this one worked out really well. Nicely done.
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Post by Matt Quinn » Mon Jul 24, 2017 1:41 am

Dave, This makes me want to try infra-red. Great range of tones. Wonderful negative space. Room for the grain to grow. Matt
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