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Member's ShowcaseA poor mans Macro

Any image that is up close and in your face.
- True macros, extreme close ups, anything that brings our small smallest subjects bigger than life.
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TomCofer
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Re: A poor mans Macro

Postby TomCofer » Tue Jul 11, 2017 1:39 pm

PLEASE NOTE:
I removed several of my posts from this thread that were missing photos. When we changed servers, we lost a lot of data. I hope in the near future to add some additional photos here.
Redneck Enthusiast Photographer on a shoestring budget.

thcofer@charter.net

Failure means you tried. Success means you need to set higher goals for yourself.

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St3v3M
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Re: A poor mans Macro

Postby St3v3M » Mon Jul 17, 2017 1:54 am

TomCofer wrote:I gained an interest in Macro & Close-up photography before I gained a budget that could afford it. I learned the hard way that cheap extension tubes (the ones that do not have contacts to adjust the aperture) are a waste of money. For those that only want to play with macro occasionally or those who don't want to spend a lot of money, I'd suggest trying out a Raynox 250. It's basically a lens that attaches to the filter threads of your regular lens. It has it's quirks, but it's cheap (under $80) and it works. I usually attach it to a cheap 55-250mm that I bought. It won't give you award winning photographs but it does let you explore the macro world a bit.

Here are some shots that I took with the 55-250mm at it's minimum focusing range and/or the Raynox.

I've thought about macro photography in the past but the setup always seemed too expensive. This is a great overview. Thank you! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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St3v3M
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Re: A poor mans Macro

Postby St3v3M » Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:01 am

There's something about that purple flower that I really love, is it a flower or a sea anemone? I love it! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Charles Haacker
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Re: A poor mans Macro

Postby Charles Haacker » Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:36 pm

St3v3M wrote:There's something about that purple flower that I really love, is it a flower or a sea anemone? I love it! S-

Tom, I love it too. I just went back and scrolled through all of them again. Each and every one is great, and it made me stop and think about the tools we use. I always like to say that cameras are like hammers; any hammer will drive a nail. Really good tools are great to have, and they often make the job easier, fit better in the hand, and that's all nice if you can afford it. Another thing I like to say is that there are always workarounds. There's usually a way to make a tool do something beyond its design specs. "Macro" is most commonly defined as photographing something at 1:1 or greater; just making something life-size or bigger than life-size. From the get-go with a pocket P&S I loved the built-in macro focusing. Beyond that you can almost always crop. My Sony RX10 close-focuses at all focal lengths without having to switch into "macro mode." It's always in macro mode. I love that. I could add the Raynox which would get even closer so I wouldn't have to crop. I am very dedicated to the KISS principle, using compact cameras with fixed zooms and not wishing to schlep more stuff (been there, done that), but I always have a little bag with spare charged batteries, cards, lens wipe, remote and so forth, so the Raynox would not add much weight or bulk and is obviously far better than a set of diopters (they are only center sharp). Ya done good, Tom! :thanks:
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|


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