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Critic's Cornerreflections of a computer bug

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PietFrancke
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reflections of a computer bug

Postby PietFrancke » Thu Jul 06, 2017 4:22 am

I don't know if I particularly care for the image, but I thought the technique interesting and am baffled by the results. You see the camera lens - the computer memory we see in the foreground, but we are looking at the reflections of a one inch steel bearing. Normally we would never have this macro lens be in focus for the reflected distance, but perhaps the focal area on the ball bearing was the DOF and anything reflected within that range was fair game and didn't blur out. This is about as close to a selfie as you will get from me!
bug.jpg

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Re: reflections of a computer bug

Postby Psjunkie » Thu Jul 06, 2017 4:42 am

You are really driving me to get interested in macro Piet......I'm just afraid If I do I'll never leave the room again...

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Re: reflections of a computer bug

Postby PietFrancke » Thu Jul 06, 2017 12:53 pm

Frank, your comment made me reflect on what it is that I want. For me, I'd like to be a better photographer. So that means taking more pictures and spreading my wings. Even as a macro photographer I preferred the still-life stacking approach to working outside. I found myself specializing in my comfort zone - learning a lot there, but leaving SO much out.

The other thing I want is to be more comfortable with Photoshop. To that end, I subscribed to/purchased Sebastian Michaels Photoshop Artistry course and have been plowing through videos and practice. I think this is helping me a great deal.

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Re: reflections of a computer bug

Postby Psjunkie » Thu Jul 06, 2017 1:51 pm

Understood Piet, thank you..

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Charles Haacker
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Re: reflections of a computer bug

Postby Charles Haacker » Thu Jul 06, 2017 2:26 pm

I like this fascinating image very much! Learning that it is reflected in a big ball bearing -- well, I never would have figured it out, making it the more fas-kin-ating.

So, not totally off-topic, a story which I'll delete if you prefer. Away back in 1963 I was stationed in Germany at a division headquarters, a hull buncha clerks and nerds. I bunked with and was friendly with the guys who worked in the very early computer section. At that stage of development it was mostly punchcards and card readers. The computers themselves were floor to almost-ceiling monsters with big reel-to-reel tape thingies whirling and backing and forwarding. Programmers used big tablet-like things that they plugged wires into, reds, greens, blues, yellows, many criss-crossing each other. The big tablets were slotted into bays in the computers along with dozens of others. If they needed to fix or change something they had to hunt down the correct bloc, pull it, fiddle with the wires, and put it back.

We were in an old German army kaserne and no building was air conditioned, not even the computer building, so it was common to leave the windows open to try to keep the computers cool. Ish. One morning my buddies came in to work, flipped on the lights, flipped the master switch to power the machinery and KKkkkkkRRRRRUUUUUnnnnhhhh!! ...and everything died, literally ground to a halt. There had been a June bug hatch. The heaven-only-knows-why UNscreened windows had been open all night. The bugs, perhaps thousands of them, seeking warmth, found the machines. :lol: :rofl:

Yeah, It was only funny in retrospect. Literal de-bugging took a couple of very icky days, and I was SO glad I was not actually in that section. :|
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All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Re: reflections of a computer bug

Postby Duck » Thu Jul 06, 2017 3:26 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:[...] Yeah, It was only funny in retrospect. Literal de-bugging took a couple of very icky days, and I was SO glad I was not actually in that section. :|

AHA! Now I know the origin to the term, "debugging"! It makes sense now. :lol:
"If you didn't learn something new today, you wasted a day."
ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

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Re: reflections of a computer bug

Postby PietFrancke » Thu Jul 06, 2017 4:18 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:I like this fascinating image very much! Learning that it is reflected in a big ball bearing -- well, I never would have figured it out, making it the more fas-kin-ating.

So, not totally off-topic, a story which I'll delete if you prefer. Away back in 1963 I was stationed in Germany at a division headquarters, a hull buncha clerks and nerds. I bunked with and was friendly with the guys who worked in the very early computer section. At that stage of development it was mostly punchcards and card readers. The computers themselves were floor to almost-ceiling monsters with big reel-to-reel tape thingies whirling and backing and forwarding. Programmers used big tablet-like things that they plugged wires into, reds, greens, blues, yellows, many criss-crossing each other. The big tablets were slotted into bays in the computers along with dozens of others. If they needed to fix or change something they had to hunt down the correct bloc, pull it, fiddle with the wires, and put it back.

We were in an old German army kaserne and no building was air conditioned, not even the computer building, so it was common to leave the windows open to try to keep the computers cool. Ish. One morning my buddies came in to work, flipped on the lights, flipped the master switch to power the machinery and KKkkkkkRRRRRUUUUUnnnnhhhh!! ...and everything died, literally ground to a halt. There had been a June bug hatch. The heaven-only-knows-why UNscreened windows had been open all night. The bugs, perhaps thousands of them, seeking warmth, found the machines. :lol: :rofl:

Yeah, It was only funny in retrospect. Literal de-bugging took a couple of very icky days, and I was SO glad I was not actually in that section. :|


my computer career began 10 years after this period of wires. I remember typing in my assembly language programs on key-punch machines. You would see license plates and recognize computer commands in them. Tapes would be created with programs on them and then the tapes would be mailed to the operation sites. Extra space would be left in the programs so that if a fix was needed, you could branch to that open area, do some things and then branch back in -- and those instructions would be verbally transmitted to the field via phone calls to the field and resident programmers would use their key punch machines to add your instructions to the run time deck.

I agree with Duck, the events you describe very well could have been the source of the debug term.

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Re: reflections of a computer bug

Postby minniev » Thu Jul 06, 2017 6:00 pm

PietFrancke wrote:I don't know if I particularly care for the image, but I thought the technique interesting and am baffled by the results. You see the camera lens - the computer memory we see in the foreground, but we are looking at the reflections of a one inch steel bearing. Normally we would never have this macro lens be in focus for the reflected distance, but perhaps the focal area on the ball bearing was the DOF and anything reflected within that range was fair game and didn't blur out. This is about as close to a selfie as you will get from me! bug.jpg


That's awesome. One of the most creative macros I've ever seen. I am in awe of how you managed to do this, from the thinking-it-up part through the execution.

The arrangement and focus seems perfect to me, but the signature Piet touch is in the color toning and use of light/shadow. Your touch on it is unmistakeable.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Re: reflections of a computer bug

Postby St3v3M » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:42 am

PietFrancke wrote:I don't know if I particularly care for the image, but I thought the technique interesting and am baffled by the results. You see the camera lens - the computer memory we see in the foreground, but we are looking at the reflections of a one inch steel bearing. Normally we would never have this macro lens be in focus for the reflected distance, but perhaps the focal area on the ball bearing was the DOF and anything reflected within that range was fair game and didn't blur out. This is about as close to a selfie as you will get from me!

You have a gift, a real gift! Wow, just wow! S-
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Re: reflections of a computer bug

Postby St3v3M » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:43 am

Charles Haacker wrote:...
So, not totally off-topic, a story which I'll delete if you prefer. Away back in 1963 I was stationed in Germany at a division headquarters, a hull buncha clerks and nerds. I bunked with and was friendly with the guys who worked in the very early computer section. At that stage of development it was mostly punchcards and card readers. The computers themselves were floor to almost-ceiling monsters with big reel-to-reel tape thingies whirling and backing and forwarding. Programmers used big tablet-like things that they plugged wires into, reds, greens, blues, yellows, many criss-crossing each other. The big tablets were slotted into bays in the computers along with dozens of others. If they needed to fix or change something they had to hunt down the correct bloc, pull it, fiddle with the wires, and put it back.

We were in an old German army kaserne and no building was air conditioned, not even the computer building, so it was common to leave the windows open to try to keep the computers cool. Ish. One morning my buddies came in to work, flipped on the lights, flipped the master switch to power the machinery and KKkkkkkRRRRRUUUUUnnnnhhhh!! ...and everything died, literally ground to a halt. There had been a June bug hatch. The heaven-only-knows-why UNscreened windows had been open all night. The bugs, perhaps thousands of them, seeking warmth, found the machines. :lol: :rofl:

Yeah, It was only funny in retrospect. Literal de-bugging took a couple of very icky days, and I was SO glad I was not actually in that section. :|

It's fun to learn our stories here. Thank you for this! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"


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