“Don't count the days, make the days count.” —Muhammad Ali

Critic's CornerMy first Bee!

Show of your technical skills with extreme close-up views of our world.
- Images are subject to constructive comment, discussion and critique. If you do not want critique post in the Member's Showcase.
User avatar
Nikodian1
Mentoris Inceptor
Mentoris Inceptor
Posts: 128
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2015 12:50 am
Reputation: 0
Location: Whyalla. South Aust
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

My first Bee!

Postby Nikodian1 » Thu Apr 30, 2015 11:09 pm

This macro photography is sucking me in!
My lunchtime is now spent outside in my garden, sandwitch in one hand camera in the other!
Out of 3 shots taken of this little fella, all hand held (the camera, not the bee!), I was happiest with this one. I know I need to edit out that bright leaf and adjust some colour tones! but I am very limited with editing resources at work!
Attachments
bee.jpg
Jenny

Critique & comments welcome, Love to learn. :photo:

One photo out of focus is a mistake, ten photo out of focus are an experimentation, one hundred photo out of focus are a style.

User avatar
TomCofer
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 2748
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2014 3:42 am
Reputation: 35
Location: Fredericktown, MO
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Re: My first Bee!

Postby TomCofer » Thu Apr 30, 2015 11:28 pm

Nice one Jenny! :)
Redneck Enthusiast Photographer on a shoestring budget.

thcofer@charter.net

Failure means you tried. Success means you need to set higher goals for yourself.

User avatar
Duck
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 1746
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2014 6:31 am
Reputation: 149
Location: Shelton, CT
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Re: My first Bee!

Postby Duck » Fri May 01, 2015 3:59 am

Ask anyone who does macro work what the biggest challenge is for a beginner and they'll likely say it's setting the proper depth of field.
Although some will argue that it is finding the patience to capture the micro world around us as they are quick to flit around and seldom stay long enough for a great capture. But then, for many, that challenge is probably part and parcel to why they enjoy macro work.

Overall, nice job for a hand held attempt. As I don't know what your settings were all I can say is try to maximize your depth of field by using a smaller aperture opening. That and maybe try both hands on the camera rather than one on a sandwich. :D

Looking forward to other postings.
"If you didn't learn something new today, you wasted a day."
ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Nikodian1
Mentoris Inceptor
Mentoris Inceptor
Posts: 128
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2015 12:50 am
Reputation: 0
Location: Whyalla. South Aust
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Re: My first Bee!

Postby Nikodian1 » Fri May 01, 2015 7:10 am

Duck wrote:Ask anyone who does macro work what the biggest challenge is for a beginner and they'll likely say it's setting the proper depth of field.
Although some will argue that it is finding the patience to capture the micro world around us as they are quick to flit around and seldom stay long enough for a great capture. But then, for many, that challenge is probably part and parcel to why they enjoy macro work.

Overall, nice job for a hand held attempt. As I don't know what your settings were all I can say is try to maximize your depth of field by using a smaller aperture opening. That and maybe try both hands on the camera rather than one on a sandwich. :D

Looking forward to other postings.


I switched to S priority because the bee was just too busy for me. The camera chose F4.5,
I had been using Aperture priority set at about f10 - f16, but this little bee would not sit long enough and my lunch break was ticking away. For static subjects I have been using full manual and my tripod.
My work colleague said to try a drop of honey on the flower to see if that makes it sit longer to capture it better. Not sure if bees like honey, I thought they just made it! :)

I agree that the biggest challenge for me is getting the depth of field correct.
Jenny

Critique & comments welcome, Love to learn. :photo:

One photo out of focus is a mistake, ten photo out of focus are an experimentation, one hundred photo out of focus are a style.

User avatar
Duck
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 1746
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2014 6:31 am
Reputation: 149
Location: Shelton, CT
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Re: My first Bee!

Postby Duck » Fri May 01, 2015 1:44 pm

Nikodian1 wrote:I switched to S priority because the bee was just too busy for me. The camera chose F4.5,
I had been using Aperture priority set at about f10 - f16, but this little bee would not sit long enough and my lunch break was ticking away. For static subjects I have been using full manual and my tripod.
My work colleague said to try a drop of honey on the flower to see if that makes it sit longer to capture it better. Not sure if bees like honey, I thought they just made it! :)

I agree that the biggest challenge for me is getting the depth of field correct.


That's the problem with priority modes, you lose some of the control. If you have the confidence to shoot manual on a tripod you should do the same hand held. Depending on your camera / lens combination you may be able to get good results at the f/16 range. If you can't get the shutter speed where you need it just up your ISO.

As for the honey trick... Try spritzing sugar water instead. It might even attract butterflies too.
"If you didn't learn something new today, you wasted a day."
ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Nikodian1
Mentoris Inceptor
Mentoris Inceptor
Posts: 128
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2015 12:50 am
Reputation: 0
Location: Whyalla. South Aust
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Re: My first Bee!

Postby Nikodian1 » Fri May 01, 2015 10:31 pm

Duck wrote:
Nikodian1 wrote:I switched to S priority because the bee was just too busy for me. The camera chose F4.5,
I had been using Aperture priority set at about f10 - f16, but this little bee would not sit long enough and my lunch break was ticking away. For static subjects I have been using full manual and my tripod.
My work colleague said to try a drop of honey on the flower to see if that makes it sit longer to capture it better. Not sure if bees like honey, I thought they just made it! :)

I agree that the biggest challenge for me is getting the depth of field correct.


That's the problem with priority modes, you lose some of the control. If you have the confidence to shoot manual on a tripod you should do the same hand held. Depending on your camera / lens combination you may be able to get good results at the f/16 range. If you can't get the shutter speed where you need it just up your ISO.

As for the honey trick... Try spritzing sugar water instead. It might even attract butterflies too.


Will most definitely try the sugar spritzing.
There was a butterfly that was getting to the end of its life that fluttered to the ground, I was about to pick it up and set it on a flower, but my little dog pounced, landing both of her furry little feet on it!
I still have my macro lens fitted so will attempt manual hand held! Ive done this on the easy peasy stuff, but never on a moving subject!
Jenny

Critique & comments welcome, Love to learn. :photo:

One photo out of focus is a mistake, ten photo out of focus are an experimentation, one hundred photo out of focus are a style.


Return to “Macro & Close-up”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests