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Critic's CornerA Southern Hemisphere view

Point your cameras up into the sky and share images, techniques and equipment notes here.
- Images are subject to constructive comment, discussion and critique. If you do not want critique post in the Member's Showcase.
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Onslow
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A Southern Hemisphere view

Postby Onslow » Mon Dec 15, 2014 5:55 am

These were taken with my Canon 5Dmk2 with my Canon EF 8-15mm f/4L Fisheye USM. Both images weer taken at 30 seconds, f4, ISO 6400 and unguided.

1) Lens is set to 15mm fl. An overall view of our Milky Way from a latitude of 33 degrees south.
Image

2) This is taken at 8mm. This gives a 180 degree fisheye view. Horizon is all the way around.
Image

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Bobby Deal
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Re: A Southern Hemisphere view

Postby Bobby Deal » Mon Dec 15, 2014 6:22 am

Really Interesting stuff and I have no idea of how to even begin to go about critiquing it. I do love the spherical full fish eye of the second shot as it kind of creates a physical point of reference one can anchor to when viewing this. I know little about this genre but it seems that logic dictates that 30 seconds of unguided exposure would be about the limit before one start to see the first development of star trails.

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TomCofer
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Re: A Southern Hemisphere view

Postby TomCofer » Sat Dec 20, 2014 6:42 pm

Very neat shots. I couldn't critic beyond that because it is out of my knowledge.
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Onslow
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Re: A Southern Hemisphere view

Postby Onslow » Sun Dec 21, 2014 1:40 am

Bobby Deal wrote:Really Interesting stuff and I have no idea of how to even begin to go about critiquing it. I do love the spherical full fish eye of the second shot as it kind of creates a physical point of reference one can anchor to when viewing this. I know little about this genre but it seems that logic dictates that 30 seconds of unguided exposure would be about the limit before one start to see the first development of star trails.


Cheers Bobby. For this sort of work, there is whats called the "500 rule". Essentially, divide 500 by the focal length of the lens. That will give you the maximum time before star trails appear to be noticeable. This is for a full frame camera and crop bodies have slightly shorter exposures. So, 500 / 8 (my lens focal length) gives 62.5 seconds. Keep the exposure for that Focal length under that and you are good to go. Then, just juggle the aperture( near wide open) and the iso to get the exposure.
I did align the camera to give a vertical look to the milky way. It reminds me of a cats eye. :)

TomCofer wrote:Very neat shots. I couldn't critic beyond that because it is out of my knowledge.


thanks Tom.

Here is some info that may help with planning shots. :)
http://starcircleacademy.com/startrails/


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