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Matt Quinn
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Minnie's geisha

Postby Matt Quinn » Thu Dec 07, 2017 3:50 am

Saw this young lady deep in the woods, and it reminded me of Minnie's Swamp Geisha. With apologies and admiration. Matt
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Re: Minnie's geisha

Postby Charles Haacker » Thu Dec 07, 2017 3:50 pm

I think that is a standout! A really good example of how to shoot monochrome! Great "print quality!" I suspect we all tend to think of woods and flora in color because it's very hard to see them in B&W, and indeed B&W of woods is often a failure, but then so is color. I still don't have a good handle on how to shoot woods in color or B&W, but this is terrific. Maybe Duck will weigh in and tell us why (beyond the obvious contrast).
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Re: Minnie's geisha

Postby Matt Quinn » Thu Dec 07, 2017 5:23 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:I think that is a standout! A really good example of how to shoot monochrome! Great "print quality!" I suspect we all tend to think of woods and flora in color because it's very hard to see them in B&W, and indeed B&W of woods is often a failure, but then so is color. I still don't have a good handle on how to shoot woods in color or B&W, but this is terrific. Maybe Duck will weigh in and tell us why (beyond the obvious contrast).


Thank you, Chuck. Eager to hear what Duck thinks so I can repeat it. I am going back to the Strings file to send Duck some of the others from the shoot. And my wife wanted me to do them in sepia. So, look for them. Matt
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Re: Minnie's geisha

Postby Matt Quinn » Thu Dec 07, 2017 5:32 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:I think that is a standout! A really good example of how to shoot monochrome! Great "print quality!" I suspect we all tend to think of woods and flora in color because it's very hard to see them in B&W, and indeed B&W of woods is often a failure, but then so is color. I still don't have a good handle on how to shoot woods in color or B&W, but this is terrific. Maybe Duck will weigh in and tell us why (beyond the obvious contrast).


Chuck, Apologies; I have neglected to thank you for the positive ratings you have given me. They flatter and encourage me. Thank you. Matt
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Re: Minnie's geisha

Postby Charles Haacker » Thu Dec 07, 2017 5:36 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:Thank you, Chuck. Eager to hear what Duck thinks so I can repeat it. I am going back to the Strings file to send Duck some of the others from the shoot. And my wife wanted me to do them in sepia. So, look for them. Matt

If I may, a suggestion? In addition to sepia, maybe try a faint blue tone for coolness. Since all the other trees are bare (one reason I suspect this works so well) it is plain that it is late fall, so the presumption is that it's chilly or flat-out cold. Sepia tends to say warmth to me. The colder tones of the straight B&W I think are a better option, but do try (it's all subjective). If I'd made it I might try a little blue and if you can you could even try a split tone, warmer for the down leaves, cooler for the rest. I've never done that so I'm just guessing. ;)
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Re: Minnie's geisha

Postby Matt Quinn » Thu Dec 07, 2017 5:45 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Matt Quinn wrote:Thank you, Chuck. Eager to hear what Duck thinks so I can repeat it. I am going back to the Strings file to send Duck some of the others from the shoot. And my wife wanted me to do them in sepia. So, look for them. Matt

If I may, a suggestion? In addition to sepia, maybe try a faint blue tone for coolness. Since all the other trees are bare (one reason I suspect this works so well) it is plain that it is late fall, so the presumption is that it's chilly or flat-out cold. Sepia tends to say warmth to me. The colder tones of the straight B&W I think are a better option, but do try (it's all subjective). If I'd made it I might try a little blue and if you can you could even try a split tone, warmer for the down leaves, cooler for the rest. I've never done that so I'm just guessing. ;)


Chuck, Poor communication on my part. The sepia is for the violins. But I will try the faint blue on the geisha. Thanks again. Matt
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Re: Minnie's geisha

Postby minniev » Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:48 pm

Thank you for your kind words, Matt, and yes I do see the connection, more strongly than you might think. I'm gonna post your Geisha's twin in this thread, but will gladly delete if you think it is a distraction. As Duck has pointed out to me in past postings of mine, photographing the beauty of a forest is HARD. I think it's because you are IN it, and you can't get distance or perspective because by doing so, you have separated yourself from its beauty and charm. So we ramble in the woods, trying to find compositions in bits and pieces. Keep at it, the beauty is worth the struggle.

Here's my image that is clearly kin to yours, taken just a stone's throw from my Firetree:
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Re: Minnie's geisha

Postby Matt Quinn » Fri Dec 08, 2017 10:01 pm

minniev wrote:Thank you for your kind words, Matt, and yes I do see the connection, more strongly than you might think. I'm gonna post your Geisha's twin in this thread, but will gladly delete if you think it is a distraction. As Duck has pointed out to me in past postings of mine, photographing the beauty of a forest is HARD. I think it's because you are IN it, and you can't get distance or perspective because by doing so, you have separated yourself from its beauty and charm. So we ramble in the woods, trying to find compositions in bits and pieces. Keep at it, the beauty is worth the struggle.

Here's my image that is clearly kin to yours, taken just a stone's throw from my Firetree:


Enchanting. Would love to wander with you.

I experience two emotions with the woods; as an observer when on the fringe, as a member when in them. With no apologies, I sense the presence of "elders" when among them. Sometimes I am stopped in my path and halted from going farther, so I merely stand and look, sometimes take a photo, sometimes don't, but always with reverence. My experience with water is different; I hear a heartbeat, a thrumming, a voice. (A psychiatrist once told me: "You know, there is not much wrong with you." I asked him if he would write me a letter to that effect and he did. I have lost the letter.) With water, I have greater difficulty taking photos because they freeze the energy of the moment, and it is a challenge to find that moment that represents all the others, to hum a note for the song.

Include the twin, if you want. I am flattered.

I went back to the twin yesterday, but her garments had dropped. Sad.

Matt
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Re: Minnie's geisha

Postby minniev » Sun Dec 10, 2017 2:05 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:
minniev wrote:Thank you for your kind words, Matt, and yes I do see the connection, more strongly than you might think. I'm gonna post your Geisha's twin in this thread, but will gladly delete if you think it is a distraction. As Duck has pointed out to me in past postings of mine, photographing the beauty of a forest is HARD. I think it's because you are IN it, and you can't get distance or perspective because by doing so, you have separated yourself from its beauty and charm. So we ramble in the woods, trying to find compositions in bits and pieces. Keep at it, the beauty is worth the struggle.

Here's my image that is clearly kin to yours, taken just a stone's throw from my Firetree:


Enchanting. Would love to wander with you.

I experience two emotions with the woods; as an observer when on the fringe, as a member when in them. With no apologies, I sense the presence of "elders" when among them. Sometimes I am stopped in my path and halted from going farther, so I merely stand and look, sometimes take a photo, sometimes don't, but always with reverence. My experience with water is different; I hear a heartbeat, a thrumming, a voice. (A psychiatrist once told me: "You know, there is not much wrong with you." I asked him if he would write me a letter to that effect and he did. I have lost the letter.) With water, I have greater difficulty taking photos because they freeze the energy of the moment, and it is a challenge to find that moment that represents all the others, to hum a note for the song.

Include the twin, if you want. I am flattered.

I went back to the twin yesterday, but her garments had dropped. Sad.

Matt


I am very prone to anthropomorphize nature - trees, seas, mountains, etc. But trees are my special friends because I don't have to go anywhere to find them. They're just here. I confess to being an inveterate treehugger, and believe the cutting of an old growth tree should be a felony offense, and tree harvesting (along with water usage) should be one of the most deeply regulated activities on the planet. Trees and water are far more important than we are because they can exist without us, but we cannot exist without them.
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Re: Minnie's geisha

Postby Matt Quinn » Mon Dec 11, 2017 2:12 am

minniev wrote:
Matt Quinn wrote:
minniev wrote:Thank you for your kind words, Matt, and yes I do see the connection, more strongly than you might think. I'm gonna post your Geisha's twin in this thread, but will gladly delete if you think it is a distraction. As Duck has pointed out to me in past postings of mine, photographing the beauty of a forest is HARD. I think it's because you are IN it, and you can't get distance or perspective because by doing so, you have separated yourself from its beauty and charm. So we ramble in the woods, trying to find compositions in bits and pieces. Keep at it, the beauty is worth the struggle.

Here's my image that is clearly kin to yours, taken just a stone's throw from my Firetree:


Enchanting. Would love to wander with you.

I experience two emotions with the woods; as an observer when on the fringe, as a member when in them. With no apologies, I sense the presence of "elders" when among them. Sometimes I am stopped in my path and halted from going farther, so I merely stand and look, sometimes take a photo, sometimes don't, but always with reverence. My experience with water is different; I hear a heartbeat, a thrumming, a voice. (A psychiatrist once told me: "You know, there is not much wrong with you." I asked him if he would write me a letter to that effect and he did. I have lost the letter.) With water, I have greater difficulty taking photos because they freeze the energy of the moment, and it is a challenge to find that moment that represents all the others, to hum a note for the song.

Include the twin, if you want. I am flattered.

I went back to the twin yesterday, but her garments had dropped. Sad.

Matt


I am very prone to anthropomorphize nature - trees, seas, mountains, etc. But trees are my special friends because I don't have to go anywhere to find them. They're just here. I confess to being an inveterate treehugger, and believe the cutting of an old growth tree should be a felony offense, and tree harvesting (along with water usage) should be one of the most deeply regulated activities on the planet. Trees and water are far more important than we are because they can exist without us, but we cannot exist without them.

Agreed. Well said. Matt
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"One should really use the camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind." Dorothea Lange


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