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― Scapes ShowcaseIt's About the Clouds

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Charles Haacker
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It's About the Clouds

Post by Charles Haacker » Thu Jul 13, 2017 4:33 pm

A couple more, one from 2014, the other from 2012. That first one (2014) is a lenticular cloud, we called it the "mothership," but it's not the most spectacular ever, just the best one we ever saw. They are fairly common in mountainous country due to the air flows that create them. They have been mistaken for UFOs.

The other is of the Rocky Mountain Front near Choteau, Montana, nearing sunset. The dynamic range was ridiculous, and I was shooting jpeg (shame, shame, shame) in a tiny sensor camera! I had to expose for the sky which meant the foreground was pretty bleakly black in the original. Admittedly the Black Angus are pretty much blocked, but my take on it is the foreground is just foreground, the picture is the sky and nostri monti. Lurves me some crepuscular rays!
Attachments
DSCN1645-2.EMlr.jpg
2014, Nikon P7800, 1/800 @ f/5, ISO 80, biased -.7, jpeg original. PP intended to really bring out the "mothership."
DSCN1646-2.MAX-2.jpg
2012, near Choteau, MT. Nikon P7000, 1/200 @ f/5.6, ISO 100, jpeg original deliberately exposed for the clouds, profoundly underexposing the foreground which has been pulled up in LR by various means including graduated filters.
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Post by Duck » Thu Jul 13, 2017 5:56 pm

I love cloud images with "God rays" shining through them. Unfortunately I don't get too many chances to see them, let alone photograph them. Of course, the cows could care less about the beauty just over their shoulder. Ah well... I guess that's why we can appreciate this image and they can't. :)
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Post by LindaShorey » Thu Jul 13, 2017 6:11 pm

#2 is awesome, Chuck! I don't mind the solid cows because we can easily tell from most of the shapes what they are :) The mountain range under those rays is icing on (or under, as it were) the cake. Gorgeous!

#1 is neat also. I sometimes see lenticular around here, but have been soooo fortunate to shoot two really well formed ones sitting right on top of Mt Rainier...which is why "cap cloud" is the common name in those instances.
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Post by minniev » Thu Jul 13, 2017 7:10 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:A couple more, one from 2014, the other from 2012. That first one (2014) is a lenticular cloud, we called it the "mothership," but it's not the most spectacular ever, just the best one we ever saw. They are fairly common in mountainous country due to the air flows that create them. They have been mistaken for UFOs.

The other is of the Rocky Mountain Front near Choteau, Montana, nearing sunset. The dynamic range was ridiculous, and I was shooting jpeg (shame, shame, shame) in a tiny sensor camera! I had to expose for the sky which meant the foreground was pretty bleakly black in the original. Admittedly the Black Angus are pretty much blocked, but my take on it is the foreground is just foreground, the picture is the sky and nostri monti. Lurves me some crepuscular rays!


I have always wanted to capture a really good lenticular cloud but never have even seen one this nice. This one's spectacular, and even better being near those craggy mountains.

The rays are so hard to get because there's nearly always some detail lost in the brightest areas. And expose for the sky is really about all you can do. This shot made me smile. I took an almost identical photo in Iceland of the same rays only the animals in the foreground, oblivious to the beauty, were sheep instead of cows. You did at least as well as I did and probably better. I was so frustrated with it I entered it into a My Image Your Look competition and interestingly, no one was able to come up with any better edit (mine was just about like yours), even with some real PP masters giving it a try. These kinds of images are just HARD!
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Post by davechinn » Fri Jul 14, 2017 11:32 am

Charles Haacker wrote:A couple more, one from 2014, the other from 2012. That first one (2014) is a lenticular cloud, we called it the "mothership," but it's not the most spectacular ever, just the best one we ever saw. They are fairly common in mountainous country due to the air flows that create them. They have been mistaken for UFOs.

The other is of the Rocky Mountain Front near Choteau, Montana, nearing sunset. The dynamic range was ridiculous, and I was shooting jpeg (shame, shame, shame) in a tiny sensor camera! I had to expose for the sky which meant the foreground was pretty bleakly black in the original. Admittedly the Black Angus are pretty much blocked, but my take on it is the foreground is just foreground, the picture is the sky and nostri monti. Lurves me some crepuscular rays!


We are planning a trip in that direction and I do hope I get to see clouds of this nature. A couple of years ago we drove to California via Route 66 and I was amazed at the various cloud/sky formation.

Excellent capture Chuck !!! I love the sun rays and the cows adds interest to the image. The first one is a cloud formation I have never seen.
Dave

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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Fri Jul 14, 2017 1:24 pm

Duck wrote:I love cloud images with "God rays" shining through them. Unfortunately I don't get too many chances to see them, let alone photograph them. Of course, the cows could care less about the beauty just over their shoulder. Ah well... I guess that's why we can appreciate this image and they can't. :)
Thanks, Duck. "God rays!" I like that. I am stealing it. As to cows, they have a lot in common with us, more interested in what is in front of their noses than what isn't. :|

LindaShorey wrote:#2 is awesome, Chuck! I don't mind the solid cows because we can easily tell from most of the shapes what they are :) The mountain range under those rays is icing on (or under, as it were) the cake. Gorgeous!

#1 is neat also. I sometimes see lenticular around here, but have been soooo fortunate to shoot two really well formed ones sitting right on top of Mt Rainier...which is why "cap cloud" is the common name in those instances.
Thanks, Linda. Now that you mention it I think I've heard the term "cap cloud." You should post those shots of Rainier! I got some not-bad ones in 2014 before the whole peak disappeared, which I hear is very common as big mountains make their own clouds.
minniev wrote:I have always wanted to capture a really good lenticular cloud but never have even seen one this nice. This one's spectacular, and even better being near those craggy mountains.

The rays are so hard to get because there's nearly always some detail lost in the brightest areas. And expose for the sky is really about all you can do. This shot made me smile. I took an almost identical photo in Iceland of the same rays only the animals in the foreground, oblivious to the beauty, were sheep instead of cows. You did at least as well as I did and probably better. I was so frustrated with it I entered it into a My Image Your Look competition and interestingly, no one was able to come up with any better edit (mine was just about like yours), even with some real PP masters giving it a try. These kinds of images are just HARD!
Thanks, Min. I always kidded myself that I could handle shooting only jpeg because I'd "learned the trick" of never overexposing an important highlight. The more raw I shoot the more I wish I'd "seen the light" (pun absolutely intended) sooner. That cloud, by the way, is the best we ever saw, but if you Google "lenticular clouds" and go to images you will discover that they can be way more spectacular!
davechinn wrote:We are planning a trip in that direction and I do hope I get to see clouds of this nature. A couple of years ago we drove to California via Route 66 and I was amazed at the various cloud/sky formation.

Excellent capture Chuck !!! I love the sun rays and the cows adds interest to the image. The first one is a cloud formation I have never seen.
Dave
Thanks, Dave, and I hope you take lots of pitchers on your trip and post them. I think the reason you may never have seen one of those clouds is that they are relatively rare at low altitudes. They become fairly common in high mountainous country, the thinking being that it's converging air currents and wind shears and stuff that make them.
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Post by LindaShorey » Fri Jul 14, 2017 6:47 pm

Re my "cap cloud" pics, I'll find and post. Thank you Chuck. You are so right about the big mountains making their own weather: I've often seen them enveloped in "whipped cream" while there is not another cloud in the sky :)
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Post by Charles Haacker » Fri Jul 14, 2017 11:59 pm

LindaShorey wrote:Re my "cap cloud" pics, I'll find and post. Thank you Chuck. You are so right about the big mountains making their own weather: I've often seen them enveloped in "whipped cream" while there is not another cloud in the sky :)

Thanks so much for posting your astonishing cap clouds! Since 2014 was THE Epic Road Trip we also got up to Rainier. On the way up we stopped at several viewpoints. At one I got this:
ImageMount Rainier by Charles Haacker, on Flickr

But by the time we got to the visitor center below the summit it looked like THIS:
ImageMount Rainier in the Cloud by Charles Haacker, on Flickr

And that was that. :| :lol: :(
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Post by LindaShorey » Sat Jul 15, 2017 11:34 am

Charles Haacker wrote:[
Thanks so much for posting your astonishing cap clouds! Since 2014 was THE Epic Road Trip we also got up to Rainier. On the way up we stopped at several viewpoints. At one I got this:

But by the time we got to the visitor center below the summit it looked like THIS:

And that was that. :| :lol: :(


LOL, it's amazing how fast the weather changes up there. I feel bad for the tourists on their one-time trips, that's for sure. Sort of like when I'd go back to Maine after a few years away, and someone would say, "Oh LAST week was absolutely perfect weather!" :wall:
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Post by rmalarz » Sat Jul 15, 2017 12:34 pm

Charles, very nice captures of some of nature's most beautiful work.
-Bob
Charles Haacker wrote:A couple more, one from 2014, the other from 2012. That first one (2014) is a lenticular cloud, we called it the "mothership," but it's not the most spectacular ever, just the best one we ever saw. They are fairly common in mountainous country due to the air flows that create them. They have been mistaken for UFOs.

The other is of the Rocky Mountain Front near Choteau, Montana, nearing sunset. The dynamic range was ridiculous, and I was shooting jpeg (shame, shame, shame) in a tiny sensor camera! I had to expose for the sky which meant the foreground was pretty bleakly black in the original. Admittedly the Black Angus are pretty much blocked, but my take on it is the foreground is just foreground, the picture is the sky and nostri monti. Lurves me some crepuscular rays!
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