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― Scapes ShowcaseMount Hood Through a Bug Splattered Windshield at 40 mph on the Hood River Bridge.

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Charles Haacker
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Mount Hood Through a Bug Splattered Windshield at 40 mph on the Hood River Bridge.

Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Jun 28, 2017 1:59 am

The Hood River Bridge is a truss bridge with a vertical lift that spans the Columbia River between Hood River, Oregon and White Salmon, Washington. It connects Interstate 84/U.S. Route 30 on the Oregon side with Washington State Route 14. Wikipedia

So I'm trying to crawl out of my hole, still occasionally reworking old stuff. Anything shot before 2015 was a jpeg but they can still be worked, especially since I was long in the practice of exposing for the highlight and developing for the shadow. This before-and-after pair was made with my little Nikon P7000 in July, 2012. Riding with friends, we were going over the Hood River Bridge over the Columbia from Washington into Oregon, with wonderful glimpses of Mighty Mount Hood. Not driving, I couldn't resist making a few exposures through the buggy windshield. At first I didn't think any were worth the bother. The windshield was not only buggy, dirty, and streaked, but tinted. The whole scene looked pretty blaaaaah, but a few hours ago I chanced on the original untouched jpeg and decided to see what could be done with it in Lightroom, with newly acquired skills.

DSCN2287-2.BIG.jpg
Pretty yuck-o, huh? There's a streak down the left side in addition to the bugs, which are mostly fuzzy thanks to being infinity focused but there are these furry blobs especially over the tower. The color is uniformly ick and the mountain is barely there.
DSCN2287-2.BIG-2.jpg
Ah! Mo-betta. I started with all my standard treatments in LR CC, then manually adjusted the color until it looked about right. I cloned out the streak and the prominent fuzzybug on the left but couldn't do much with the bugs on the tower so I left them. I felt the prominent lamp standard was a distraction so I cloned it out. Then it was pretty much one word: graduated filter and dehaze. Well, 3 words. (Dang. I just spotted another blob I could've corrected.)
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Post by PietFrancke » Wed Jun 28, 2017 2:16 am

it looks amazing Chuck. Love that bridge, love the depth you gave this image.

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Post by minniev » Wed Jun 28, 2017 3:17 am

Charles Haacker wrote:The Hood River Bridge is a truss bridge with a vertical lift that spans the Columbia River between Hood River, Oregon and White Salmon, Washington. It connects Interstate 84/U.S. Route 30 on the Oregon side with Washington State Route 14. Wikipedia

So I'm trying to crawl out of my hole, still occasionally reworking old stuff. Anything shot before 2015 was a jpeg but they can still be worked, especially since I was long in the practice of exposing for the highlight and developing for the shadow. This before-and-after pair was made with my little Nikon P7000 in July, 2012. Riding with friends, we were going over the Hood River Bridge over the Columbia from Washington into Oregon, with wonderful glimpses of Mighty Mount Hood. Not driving, I couldn't resist making a few exposures through the buggy windshield. At first I didn't think any were worth the bother. The windshield was not only buggy, dirty, and streaked, but tinted. The whole scene looked pretty blaaaaah, but a few hours ago I chanced on the original untouched jpeg and decided to see what could be done with it in Lightroom, with newly acquired skills.

DSCN2287-2.BIG.jpgDSCN2287-2.BIG-2.jpg


Wow, what a difference! You teased out all that detail, fixed that crazy color caste and the bug-splats, and all from a moving vehicle! Ain't Lightroom great? Photoshop too.

Glad you dug your way back here. Hang around and keep sharing fun stuff like this.
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Post by davechinn » Wed Jun 28, 2017 9:26 am

Charles Haacker wrote:The Hood River Bridge is a truss bridge with a vertical lift that spans the Columbia River between Hood River, Oregon and White Salmon, Washington. It connects Interstate 84/U.S. Route 30 on the Oregon side with Washington State Route 14. Wikipedia

So I'm trying to crawl out of my hole, still occasionally reworking old stuff. Anything shot before 2015 was a jpeg but they can still be worked, especially since I was long in the practice of exposing for the highlight and developing for the shadow. This before-and-after pair was made with my little Nikon P7000 in July, 2012. Riding with friends, we were going over the Hood River Bridge over the Columbia from Washington into Oregon, with wonderful glimpses of Mighty Mount Hood. Not driving, I couldn't resist making a few exposures through the buggy windshield. At first I didn't think any were worth the bother. The windshield was not only buggy, dirty, and streaked, but tinted. The whole scene looked pretty blaaaaah, but a few hours ago I chanced on the original untouched jpeg and decided to see what could be done with it in Lightroom, with newly acquired skills.

DSCN2287-2.BIG.jpgDSCN2287-2.BIG-2.jpg



This an excellent image Chuck. If you had not included a description I would have never know it was shot through a windshield. The leading line of the bridge has such impact that I can't miss Mount Hood. A fantastic image, love it.
Dave
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Post by LindaShorey » Wed Jun 28, 2017 11:58 am

The roadway and towers make a terrific frame for the mountain. Well worth the work! Enjoyed this very much, Chuck.
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Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Jun 28, 2017 3:19 pm

davechinn wrote:This an excellent image Chuck. If you had not included a description I would have never know it was shot through a windshield. The leading line of the bridge has such impact that I can't miss Mount Hood. A fantastic image, love it.
Dave
Thanks, Dave. That is high praise indeed! :thanks:
minniev wrote:Wow, what a difference! You teased out all that detail, fixed that crazy color caste and the bug-splats, and all from a moving vehicle! Ain't Lightroom great? Photoshop too.

Glad you dug your way back here. Hang around and keep sharing fun stuff like this.
Thanks, Min. I'm trying. Goes by fits and starts. :| I love Photoshop when it's needed, but more and more I use Lightroom alone, as in this case. Sometimes I use both, but I always start in Lightroom and then go to PS for something LR either doesn't do well, or at all.
PietFrancke wrote:it looks amazing Chuck. Love that bridge, love the depth you gave this image.
Thanks so much, Piet, and it's good to see you here! :thumbup:
LindaShorey wrote:The roadway and towers make a terrific frame for the mountain. Well worth the work! Enjoyed this very much, Chuck.
Thanks Linda! I was actually surprised at what I could do with it. Skills and tools keep evolving. :)
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Post by St3v3M » Wed Jul 05, 2017 5:13 am

Charles Haacker wrote:Ah! Mo-betta. I started with all my standard treatments in LR CC, then manually adjusted the color until it looked about right. I cloned out the streak and the prominent fuzzybug on the left but couldn't do much with the bugs on the tower so I left them. I felt the prominent lamp standard was a distraction so I cloned it out. Then it was pretty much one word: graduated filter and dehaze. Well, 3 words.

It's interesting that the leading lines drive me toward the bridge, but my love of mountains keeps me coming back to Mount Hood. I like this and the way the guardrail is acting as the horizon. Looking at it again I wonder if I would feel differently about it had the bridge been more in the rule of thirds and not edged out like it is. This is a lesson I'll remember, that while leading lines do direct your attention the star of the show can override the so-called rules. Thank you for this! S-
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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Jul 05, 2017 4:46 pm

St3v3M wrote:It's interesting that the leading lines drive me toward the bridge, but my love of mountains keeps me coming back to Mount Hood. I like this and the way the guardrail is acting as the horizon. Looking at it again I wonder if I would feel differently about it had the bridge been more in the rule of thirds and not edged out like it is. This is a lesson I'll remember, that while leading lines do direct your attention the star of the show can override the so-called rules. Thank you for this! S-

Thank you for looking and commenting, Steve, and I completely agree about dem "rules." I've seen a lot of opinions on the so-called rules, most of them concluding that they really ought to be called suggestions or guidelines. That's how I think of them. In this case, of course, I was trapped in a moving car. I think I made probably six original exposures, looking for one that showed the mountain the best so it was also spray'n'pray. There's no question that studying composition and trying to apply the guidelines is a very good idea, and I do most of the time. It's good you mentioned this. It does seem to break compositional "rules" yet it still also seems to work. Hmmm :|
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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