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― Scapes CritiqueLittle Village in the Sun - Isle of Harris

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Little Village in the Sun - Isle of Harris

Post by minniev » Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:29 pm

There were rainbows often, because sun and rain change places so quickly here. But they seldom last but moments and they weren't usually the kinds of big bows I'm accustomed to seeing in the US, just little sparkles for a short while.

Any feedback or suggestions are appreciated, edits also are fine.
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"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by uuglypher » Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:52 pm

ppetmp.jpg


Dave

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Post by Psjunkie » Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:14 pm

Sounds like Dave needs you in a boat, looks pretty steep along the edge....wonderful image minniev with a natural look....

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Post by uuglypher » Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:18 pm

minniev wrote:There were rainbows often, because sun and rain change places so quickly here. But they seldom last but moments and they weren't usually the kinds of big bows I'm accustomed to seeing in the US, just little sparkles for a short while.

Any feedback or suggestions are appreciated, edits also are fine.


What an absolutely lovely capture!
Dramatic sky, fortuitous rainbow, and spot-lit village in an archetypal hebridean setting of admirable depth!

The only constructive comment I might offer would be that under a similar circumstance where a broad body of open water plays a compositional role,, "working the scene" ought include some lower perspectives to foreshorten that body of water , not to lessen its significance, but to allow the peripheral features to assume a bit more prominence.(see example above)
ppetmp.jpg


Dave

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Post by minniev » Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:44 pm

uuglypher wrote:
minniev wrote:There were rainbows often, because sun and rain change places so quickly here. But they seldom last but moments and they weren't usually the kinds of big bows I'm accustomed to seeing in the US, just little sparkles for a short while.

Any feedback or suggestions are appreciated, edits also are fine.


What an absolutely lovely capture!
Dramatic sky, fortuitous rainbow, and spot-lit village in an archetypal hebridean setting of admirable depth!

The only constructive comment I might offer would be that under a similar circumstance where a broad body of open water plays a compositional role,, "working the scene" ought include some lower perspectives to foreshorten that body of water , not to lessen its significance, but to allow the peripheral features to assume a bit more prominence.(see example above)ppetmp.jpg

Dave


Interesting and effective adaptation, Dave, and a good point. I am sure I missed many opportunities while standing gaping at the breadth of the scenery, so unlike anything we have in the US.

I also ran into the limits of our American desire for "foreground elements", which in many of these elevated locations, consists mainly of air.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by minniev » Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:49 pm

Psjunkie wrote:Sounds like Dave needs you in a boat, looks pretty steep along the edge....wonderful image minniev with a natural look....


A boat would have been nice on several occasions. And especially, an extra month on these beautiful islands. Graham warned me they were habit forming and he was right.

Thanks, glad you liked it. (and you're right about steep, I have many shots from high viewpoints where I felt I was on the edge of the world).
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by Charles Haacker » Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:58 pm

I absolutely love the shot, but surprised myself by thinking I liked it better by scrolling down until I completely cropped away the foreground element, even more radically than Dave's. I think the water is foreground enough and does not distract from that magnificent sky. Wow, Wotta shot! (OK)
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(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

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Post by minniev » Tue Sep 19, 2017 4:59 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:I absolutely love the shot, but surprised myself by thinking I liked it better by scrolling down until I completely cropped away the foreground element, even more radically than Dave's. I think the water is foreground enough and does not distract from that magnificent sky. Wow, Wotta shot! (OK)

Thank you Chuck, glad you liked it. You're right that the whole picture is from the water upwards. I think I included that little line of cliff edge or whatever it was simply as a border, but you're right that it may not even be needed. All the good stuff is somewhere else!
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by uuglypher » Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:12 pm

minniev wrote:[

Interesting and effective adaptation, Dave, and a good point. I am sure I missed many opportunities while standing gaping at the breadth of the scenery, so unlike anything we have in the US.

I also ran into the limits of our American desire for "foreground elements", which in many of these elevated locations, consists mainly of air.


Hi, Min,
I'd like to take exception to your claim that a "...desire for "foreground elements" " is a particularly American predilection.
Attention to the compositional merits of foreground elements was evident in many of the works of many English, Scottish, and French landscape painters of the 18th and 19th Centuries, many of of whose works influneced and informed those of the Hudson River School and other American landscape artists. Of course, exceptions are easy to find, but the explicit attention to foreground compositional elements by myriad fine European artists , including modern landscape photographers, militates against the assumption that incorporation of foreground elements it is merely an "American" affectation.

Dave

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Post by minniev » Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:33 pm

uuglypher wrote:
minniev wrote:[

Interesting and effective adaptation, Dave, and a good point. I am sure I missed many opportunities while standing gaping at the breadth of the scenery, so unlike anything we have in the US.

I also ran into the limits of our American desire for "foreground elements", which in many of these elevated locations, consists mainly of air.


Hi, Min,
I'd like to take exception to your claim that a "...desire for "foreground elements" " is a particularly American predilection.
Attention to the compositional merits of foreground elements was evident in many of the works of many English, Scottish, and French landscape painters of the 18th and 19th Centuries, many of of whose works influneced and informed those of the Hudson River School and other American landscape artists. Of course, exceptions are easy to find, but the explicit attention to foreground compositional elements by myriad fine European artists , including modern landscape photographers, militates against the assumption that incorporation of foreground elements it is merely an "American" affectation.

Dave


Always happy to be corrected by knowledgeable folks like you Dave, as you obviously know what you're talking about when it comes to art! I look for good foreground elements just like the rest of us. And am delighted when and if it all falls into place.

I do sometimes chafe at those who make these or any traditionally established compositional elements formulaic, though, sometimes to the point of the absurd.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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