"The more we study, the more we discover our ignorance." —Percy Bysshe Shelley

― Scapes CritiqueWalk 20 Paces, Turn, and Fire

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minniev
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Re: Walk 20 Paces, Turn, and Fire

Post by minniev » Mon May 22, 2017 12:35 am

Charles Haacker wrote:
minniev wrote:
Duck wrote:Wrong way of thinking, my friend. It's not about the pixels, it's about the story.

For me it has always been about the story, and I've happily shot away with my less than auspicious equipment and printed at home up to 13x19 without a hitch. Only after I got this darned award last month did pixels ever become a thing I thought about. Now I have to learn how to print larger than I've ever done, suitable for display, and the pixel disease has struck me with a vengeance. If you have a cure, please send it quickly :) .

I've said it before and I'll say it again: ya ain't supposed to get your nose on a pitcher! :| I have seen Seurat's famed Sunday Afternoon in the flesh at the Chicago Art Institute. In the first place it is huge, about 7x10 feet. ImageCharles Haacker, on Flickr

It hangs alone in a room that allows you to stand 20+ feet away, but of course people go up and look closely to see Seurat's tiny points of color (I waited until someone did just that, mostly for scale). When I was in school (before the last great extinction) our mentors taught that photographs were made of silver grains, therefore grain was normal, and you could make a billboard from a 35mm Tri-X negative and no one would notice since no one gets their nose up to a billboard. That said, I don't know if the award folks make pixel-peeping part of their judging criteria, but in my opinion they should not.


The anxiety is me inflicting it on myself, partly because I lack knowledge and experience in large prints, and partly because I do know my equipment is not very forgiving in and of itself. I'm encouraged by what Duck and others are telling me, and am hoping for a less stressful outcome than what I've worked myself up over. Thanks for the vote of confidence. We shall see!
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by Duck » Mon May 22, 2017 3:36 pm

Ernst-Ulrich Schafer just posted a link to a video interview of photographer, Jerry Uelsmann, who does image manipulation in the darkroom (think analog photoshop). I haven't made my whole way through the video but at 2:30 there is a nice quote that pertains to you, Minnie. When asked about his choice of equipment he replies that it's not so much about the equipment;

“The camera is a license to explore.”
"If you didn't learn something new today, you wasted a day."
Image ImageImageImageImageImage

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Post by minniev » Mon May 22, 2017 4:49 pm

Duck wrote:Ernst-Ulrich Schafer just posted a link to a video interview of photographer, Jerry Uelsmann, who does image manipulation in the darkroom (think analog photoshop). I haven't made my whole way through the video but at 2:30 there is a nice quote that pertains to you, Minnie. When asked about his choice of equipment he replies that it's not so much about the equipment;

“The camera is a license to explore.”

Thank you, I"ll check it out.

It has been interesting to me to run into this challenge and I"m sure I'll grow from it. I've never worried about my camera choice before, but insecurity has a way of sneaking in when the door of inexperience is open. I have no intention of changing camera formats, just upgrading along the same line of Olympus m43 cameras as I have since I started, trading up to a newer model as I can afford, but preserving my lens collection. It seems like the only sensible thing to do for me. That has always meant understanding its limitations (every camera has some) and working around them.

I so appreciate the support I'm finding here. My online friends around the world have been the greatest influence on my work, and I would never have got this far without them.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by St3v3M » Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:44 am

Duck wrote:
minniev wrote:...I have nightmares about pixels.

... it's about the story.

We tell the story we want others to hear! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by St3v3M » Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:47 am

minniev wrote:... If you have a cure, please send it quickly :) .

Deep breaths to get you past the hard times, but always remember why you're doing this! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by St3v3M » Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:54 am

Duck wrote:...“The camera is a license to explore.”

I've always loved this quote! Thank you for adding it here, S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by St3v3M » Thu Jun 01, 2017 4:21 am

minniev wrote:...
Comments, suggestions, critique, edits are all appreciated. dam (1 of 1).jpg

This is art that stands on it's own, and the only suggestion I might make is to crop up depending on the size of the final. Beautiful! S-
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Post by Charles Haacker » Thu Jun 01, 2017 2:48 pm

I still say that cameras are like hammers; any one will drive a nail (the, um, hammer, not the camera). Now, I like good tools, and there is no question that the tools you use are excellent. Staging up for whatever reason is perfectly legit. I am wedded to compacts yet have staged up to a larger sensor. It has been enlightening to notice that there seems little discernible difference between stuff I shot with my "serious" compacts that all have 1/1.7 sensors (the P7800 has a backlit CMOS as well), and my "new" Sony "compact" (that weighs almost 2 pounds) with its "yuge" 1" CMOS sensor. Until little more than 2 years ago I shot 100% jpegs. Now I shoot 100% raw, yet as I go back and root through older stuff made with smaller sensors and output as jpegs I find that I can improve on the original PP and it all looks fine. I certainly want cameras I can control, fully manually if I choose, but most of the time I don't bother unless I disagree with the automation. I'm a little more cognizant of noise control now than I used to be, but the point of all this is that I think cameras and PP are just tools to make the best image we can. If someone who should know better makes an issue of the camera used or the finishing applied or complains about noise/grain, then I suggest they are not looking at the Big Picture. And that's not intended to be punny. :D
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Post by minniev » Thu Jun 01, 2017 5:12 pm

St3v3M wrote:
minniev wrote:...
Comments, suggestions, critique, edits are all appreciated. dam (1 of 1).jpg

This is art that stands on it's own, and the only suggestion I might make is to crop up depending on the size of the final. Beautiful! S-


Thank you. The final crop is as yet to be determined. It will depend on what I learn about upsizing and printing larger prints. I hate to waste money but am sure I'll have to eventually hold my breath and print one big to see what my real constraints may be, and which I am just worried unnecessarily about.

I have always felt free to crop with abandon, because I was printing on a limited size, no more than 13x19, and felt I could control the output myself. As I confront the challenge of bigger prints, I have to learn and think a little differently.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by minniev » Thu Jun 01, 2017 5:18 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:I still say that cameras are like hammers; any one will drive a nail (the, um, hammer, not the camera). Now, I like good tools, and there is no question that the tools you use are excellent. Staging up for whatever reason is perfectly legit. I am wedded to compacts yet have staged up to a larger sensor. It has been enlightening to notice that there seems little discernible difference between stuff I shot with my "serious" compacts that all have 1/1.7 sensors (the P7800 has a backlit CMOS as well), and my "new" Sony "compact" (that weighs almost 2 pounds) with its "yuge" 1" CMOS sensor. Until little more than 2 years ago I shot 100% jpegs. Now I shoot 100% raw, yet as I go back and root through older stuff made with smaller sensors and output as jpegs I find that I can improve on the original PP and it all looks fine. I certainly want cameras I can control, fully manually if I choose, but most of the time I don't bother unless I disagree with the automation. I'm a little more cognizant of noise control now than I used to be, but the point of all this is that I think cameras and PP are just tools to make the best image we can. If someone who should know better makes an issue of the camera used or the finishing applied or complains about noise/grain, then I suggest they are not looking at the Big Picture. And that's not intended to be punny. :D


I've always been totally content with my 4/3 and m4/3 format photos, and never gave a thought to sensor size. I have consistently argued with people who denigrated these cameras because they work well for me, they are easy to handle, easy to hike with, easy to use, and easy on the pocketbook. But the one thing I haven't had to worry about was large prints because I just didn't need any. My house is not that big, not were my ambitions. The dam birds changed the land under my feet a little, and I have to consider things I didn't think important before.

It'll work out, but I don't know my path yet, and thus my anxiety. I have a pro acquaintance who has done large prints from the same cameras I use, and he assures me, as all of you do, that it is possible. I'm just not sure how to get there yet.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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