"I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work." — Thomas Alva Edison

Image ProcessingThe Picture that Hooked Me on Digital Post Processing. PLEASE POST YOUR OWN IF

User avatar
Charles Haacker
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1702
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 7:20 pm
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

The Picture that Hooked Me on Digital Post Processing. PLEASE POST YOUR OWN IF

Post by Charles Haacker » Mon Jan 22, 2018 3:33 am

I had a copy of Elements 2.0 back even before I owned a digital camera. We were in Colorado 2006-ish. I had my Canon T90 loaded with Fujichrome 400. When we got back Daphne had the processor make a disc of the slides. The pix below I credit with opening my mind to the possibilities of digital.

We hoped to see a train come out of the Moffat Tunnel East Portal, 9,200' elevation, so we waited. And waited. And sunburn. We knew a train was in the tunnel but we couldn't know how long before it burst out into the sun and wouldn't ya know I was down to my very last frame! Of my very last roll! I would literally get ONE shot.😱

This one:
original.jpg
(You can see from the right side of the frame that the roll nearly tore off it was so close.)

So my timing was as always (he blushed modestly) impeccable for my single only last frame on the roll only 'xcept there's these two yutzes wandering around in my carefully selected frame. I've been standing in the blinding 9,200' sun for an hour. I've previsualized the poo out of this one-off-make-or-break-shot so naturally at THE moment décisif these two mutts come waltzing in and roooooooon my carefully plotted pitcher! :o :x

In the past there is practically nothing to be done about it, but with my Elements 2.0 I start to play to see what can be done:
rework.jpg
I first tried the dodging tool just to see what would happen if I tried to open the shadow in the undercarriage. I was astounded! Remember this is a digital file from a slide (400 speed hence the grain), yet there was detail under there that was otherwise invisible. I figured out how to use the clone stamp to obliterate the two interlopers. I straightened the vertical, removed the pole and wires... The version above is about the 3rd or 4th rework, the most recent one done in Elements 11, the last version I had before I switched to Creative Cloud. I now see flaws in this one I should go back and fix.
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

User avatar
LindaShorey
Mentoris Secundus
Mentoris Secundus
Posts: 1398
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 11:50 am
Location: Yakima, WA
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by LindaShorey » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:12 pm

Chuck, here is a fantastic testament to being open to changes and advances in one's profession or hobby, and to your drive for perfection...or simply satisfaction in a job well done. I enjoyed your storytelling very much!
"What's important in a photograph and what isn't." http://photographylife.com/whats-import ... -what-isnt

User avatar
Charles Haacker
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1702
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 7:20 pm
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Post by Charles Haacker » Mon Jan 22, 2018 3:03 pm

LindaShorey wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:12 pm
Chuck, here is a fantastic testament to being open to changes and advances in one's profession or hobby, and to your drive for perfection...or simply satisfaction in a job well done. I enjoyed your storytelling very much!
Thanks, Linda! I'm glad this happened in my lifetime; I just wish it hadn't happened so late. I used to think I enjoyed photography in analog days; now I know I didn't really, truly emote on photography until pretty much the last 10 years. There are hardly enough superlatives to describe the tectonic shifts, and I'm jus' playin'. Duck is showing what he can do in the studio that I'd have killed to be able to do 30 years ago. :look:
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

User avatar
minniev
Mentoris Maximus
Mentoris Maximus
Posts: 2849
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 3:55 am
Location: Mississippi
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by minniev » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:12 pm

It is play that frees us and our creativity from the shackles it may have had when we were racing the clock to get bills paid, meals on the table, kids to ball practice. Creativity has a hard run in those days, and most of us shelve it. Too many of us never take it back off the shelf when we can, becoming consumers of whatever art catches our eye rather than creators of it.

You have embraced your creativity, and who knows where it will end up. Your train picture was just a minor miracle that opened one door for you. There are many more.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

User avatar
Charles Haacker
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1702
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 7:20 pm
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Post by Charles Haacker » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:51 pm

minniev wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:12 pm
It is play that frees us and our creativity from the shackles it may have had when we were racing the clock to get bills paid, meals on the table, kids to ball practice. Creativity has a hard run in those days, and most of us shelve it. Too many of us never take it back off the shelf when we can, becoming consumers of whatever art catches our eye rather than creators of it.

You have embraced your creativity, and who knows where it will end up. Your train picture was just a minor miracle that opened one door for you. There are many more.
Thanks so much for the encouragement, Minnie. (Say, bye the bye, I was in Voldemart yestiddy and they hadda pitcher of the Tour Eiffel all covered with rhinestones 'n' stuff! I was gonna buy it but I only had enuf fer coff medicine.) :rofl:
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

User avatar
PietFrancke
Mentoris Quartus
Mentoris Quartus
Posts: 872
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:38 pm
Location: WV
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by PietFrancke » Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:50 pm

good story and image Chuck. The things that grab our attention and change our lives and what we do with them.

User avatar
Matt Quinn
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1819
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:12 pm
Location: MD in winter: Cape Cod in summer
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Post by Matt Quinn » Mon Jan 22, 2018 11:54 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 3:33 am
I had a copy of Elements 2.0 back even before I owned a digital camera. We were in Colorado 2006-ish. I had my Canon T90 loaded with Fujichrome 400. When we got back Daphne had the processor make a disc of the slides. The pix below I credit with opening my mind to the possibilities of digital.

We hoped to see a train come out of the Moffat Tunnel East Portal, 9,200' elevation, so we waited. And waited. And sunburn. We knew a train was in the tunnel but we couldn't know how long before it burst out into the sun and wouldn't ya know I was down to my very last frame! Of my very last roll! I would literally get ONE shot.😱

This one: original.jpg(You can see from the right side of the frame that the roll nearly tore off it was so close.)

So my timing was as always (he blushed modestly) impeccable for my single only last frame on the roll only 'xcept there's these two yutzes wandering around in my carefully selected frame. I've been standing in the blinding 9,200' sun for an hour. I've previsualized the poo out of this one-off-make-or-break-shot so naturally at THE moment décisif these two mutts come waltzing in and roooooooon my carefully plotted pitcher! :o :x

In the past there is practically nothing to be done about it, but with my Elements 2.0 I start to play to see what can be done:rework.jpg
I first tried the dodging tool just to see what would happen if I tried to open the shadow in the undercarriage. I was astounded! Remember this is a digital file from a slide (400 speed hence the grain), yet there was detail under there that was otherwise invisible. I figured out how to use the clone stamp to obliterate the two interlopers. I straightened the vertical, removed the pole and wires... The version above is about the 3rd or 4th rework, the most recent one done in Elements 11, the last version I had before I switched to Creative Cloud. I now see flaws in this one I should go back and fix.
Wow. I am amazed at what you did with the undercarriage. This encourages me to tinker more with that area in my photos. Thanks Chuck. Matt
Matt Quinn

"One should really use the camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind." Dorothea Lange

User avatar
Charles Haacker
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1702
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 7:20 pm
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Jan 24, 2018 3:39 pm

PietFrancke wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:50 pm
good story and image Chuck. The things that grab our attention and change our lives and what we do with them.
Thank you, Piet!
Matt Quinn wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 11:54 pm
Wow. I am amazed at what you did with the undercarriage. This encourages me to tinker more with that area in my photos. Thanks Chuck. Matt
Thanks, Matt. Don't overlook all the many tools there are for opening shadow detail, too. I think you have CC and often start in Lightroom? The shadow slider often does a very good job, and there's also the curve tool that has a little onscreen slider that can do very targeted adjustments. I used the dodge tool all those years ago because it was what I was already used to from wet darkroom days.
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

User avatar
minniev
Mentoris Maximus
Mentoris Maximus
Posts: 2849
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 3:55 am
Location: Mississippi
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by minniev » Wed Jan 24, 2018 10:12 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Wed Jan 24, 2018 3:39 pm
...from wet darkroom days.
After following your thread, Chuck, I went back and looked at my first post processed images, back in 2008, to recall my own amazement. I had just got my first DSLR, and my first copy of Lightroom (v2 I think). I had been using a point and shoot for about 2 years previously, but only downloaded them into the computer and occasionally printed some of the better ones out, but had no idea how to make them better than they were. I knew a little about the exposure triangle left over from film days many decades before so there were some that did come out OK. But WOW, with that DSLR, even with its paltry 10 mp, and LR2, what an adventure! With better software and more knowledge, I enjoy going back and reprocessing some of them, but even then, this was magic.

My travel friend and I took a trip to New Brunswick that year, soon after my purchases, expressly to see the Hopewell Rocks. If you've ever been there you know how hard they are to photograph at any time of day because of the contrast between the lights and darks. I was still new enough at this to be disheartened that the photos were almost monochrome and silhouette instead of the rich red-purples of the sea-sculpted rocks and deep blues of the sky. But as I worked with them and saw them turn into what I SAW, I was hooked. It was the same magic I remembered from the old darkroom, watching the picture take shape in the murky liquid. Only without the smell or the heat.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

User avatar
Charles Haacker
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1702
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 7:20 pm
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Post by Charles Haacker » Thu Jan 25, 2018 2:59 pm

minniev wrote:
Wed Jan 24, 2018 10:12 pm
Charles Haacker wrote:
Wed Jan 24, 2018 3:39 pm
...from wet darkroom days.
After following your thread, Chuck, I went back and looked at my first post processed images, back in 2008, to recall my own amazement. I had just got my first DSLR, and my first copy of Lightroom (v2 I think). I had been using a point and shoot for about 2 years previously, but only downloaded them into the computer and occasionally printed some of the better ones out, but had no idea how to make them better than they were. I knew a little about the exposure triangle left over from film days many decades before so there were some that did come out OK. But WOW, with that DSLR, even with its paltry 10 mp, and LR2, what an adventure! With better software and more knowledge, I enjoy going back and reprocessing some of them, but even then, this was magic.

My travel friend and I took a trip to New Brunswick that year, soon after my purchases, expressly to see the Hopewell Rocks. If you've ever been there you know how hard they are to photograph at any time of day because of the contrast between the lights and darks. I was still new enough at this to be disheartened that the photos were almost monochrome and silhouette instead of the rich red-purples of the sea-sculpted rocks and deep blues of the sky. But as I worked with them and saw them turn into what I SAW, I was hooked. It was the same magic I remembered from the old darkroom, watching the picture take shape in the murky liquid. Only without the smell or the heat.
Min, if you like, please post your own! I just amended the topic title. I suspect what hooked a lot of us was being in wet darkrooms watching that magic take place in the developing tray. You and I and I'm sure many others never got over it, yet while I get personally nostalgic at the perfume of acetic acid I don't really miss it. I'd love to see anything anyone wants to show of oldies but goodies revisited... :thanks:
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests