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Image ProcessingRainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

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Charles Haacker
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Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby Charles Haacker » Wed Oct 25, 2017 9:13 pm

This is in editing because the three pictures displayed here have been reworked in Lightroom from the original file this morning. The original picture is a raw capture from my Nikon P7800, made in September 2015. We took a couple of weeks and made part of the Lake Superior Circle.

Rainbow Falls Provincial Park has many falls, this one perhaps less spectacular than some, but I noted from signage here that this one was called rainbow not for the usual reason but for the brilliant colors of its wet rocks. I had a time getting down here (Daphne stayed safely up on a bench) and it was probably nuts of me to risk a broken leg getting out on wet rocks but we all knows we goes where the pitcher is. I am open to comment and gentle criticism :|

We were there around 6-ish, golden hour, but I hadn't figured on the sun putting half of the creek in bright sun and the other half in deep shadow. I was glad that I'd spent that entire year shooting everything in raw and learning to work in Lightroom, but I was still cautious not to overexpose the brilliant whites of the foaming current. Shooting hand held while crouched on wet rocks next to a boiling rapid I kept the shutter high, besides which I honestly don't care much for the silky water look. I this it's becoming somewhat cliched and besides, shouldn't a rapid look like a rapid? Anyway, the subject of the picture I was making was the rocks.

My original effort at PP is the middle one. This morning's is last. I feel there is considerable improvement in two years.
Attachments
DSCN5754.EMlr-01.jpg
This is the SOOC raw capture. I metered for the brightest area of white foam in the lower left, crossed my fingers and hoped for the best in the rocks in post. This is at the original exposure so I was pretty pleased.
DSCN5754.EMlr-02.jpg
This was how I originally finished it, all in Lightroom late in 2015. I was pretty chuffed with it and had it up on my Flickr, but someone smarter than I remarked that the sunlit bank was too bright relative to the rocks. I acknowledged she was right but did not get around to trying to correct it until today.
DSCN5754.EMlr-03.jpg
I have always had a tendency to tip my camera to the right so I fixed that. Then I zeroed everything out and started over. I pulled highlights all the way down and shadows all the way up. I "printed" for the sunlit bank first, then dragged up a graduated filter to cover the rocks, increased the saturation a little, this and that (okay I forgot). But I like it better than the 2015 effort. I think it's much better balanced, exposure and color-wise.
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Re: Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby Matt Quinn » Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:11 pm

Chuck, Agreed. #3 is the best. But I don't find the rocks that attractive. Too brassy for me at the bottom. And for me the angle of perspective (?), tilting down, is disorienting. I feel I am tipping over as I look at the rocks at the bottom. Sorry, but this one doesn't work for me at all. Got another? Matt
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Charles Haacker
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Re: Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby Charles Haacker » Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:37 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:Chuck, Agreed. #3 is the best. But I don't find the rocks that attractive. Too brassy for me at the bottom. And for me the angle of perspective (?), tilting down, is disorienting. I feel I am tipping over as I look at the rocks at the bottom. Sorry, but this one doesn't work for me at all. Got another? Matt

Not everything can possibly work for everybody. I was zoomed back to the shortest focal length, equivalent to a 28 mm, and for me the rocks were the picture. I did make some others but personally did not find any of them interesting enough to finish. The other viewer I mentioned didn't care much for the picture either, feeling that the rapid was the picture and not the rocks, so maybe you've got something there. (?) I love the picture but I was there. I just scrolled down to look again and discovered that if you crop it to a square from bottom it shouldn't be disorienting... :)
Attachments
DSCN5754.EMlr-04.jpg
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
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Re: Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby Matt Quinn » Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:52 pm

This I like. Easier on my balance. And, for some reason, it makes the rocks less brassy. Also, maybe the proportion is what bothers me; the rocks are too prominent or too close, even though they are the primary subject. thanks for replying. I do like the falls/water treatment. Matt
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Re: Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby LindaShorey » Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:53 pm

This is one that needs to be viewed in entirety all at once, not scrolling down a page. I "get" the viewpoint, perhaps because of my own experiences with an ultra-wide angle lens, and yes for me, the subject is the rocks :)

I love the levels going up and up and back and back. Colors might be hard to accept if one hasn't seen (like our discussions about sunsets and even just the brilliant blue of western, dry air). Super job on the exposure IMO, Chuck, and more interesting with the shadows than if full sun, I expect.

A super presentation for those who are just getting into raw and pp!

(edit - the crop is very nice too!)
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Re: Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby Charles Haacker » Wed Oct 25, 2017 11:06 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:This I like. Easier on my balance. And, for some reason, it makes the rocks less brassy. Also, maybe the proportion is what bothers me; the rocks are too prominent or too close, even though they are the primary subject. thanks for replying. I do like the falls/water treatment. Matt

Thanks again, Matt. Linda makes a point also about "stepping back." See my reply below
LindaShorey wrote:This is one that needs to be viewed in entirety all at once, not scrolling down a page. I "get" the viewpoint, perhaps because of my own experiences with an ultra-wide angle lens, and yes for me, the subject is the rocks :)

I love the levels going up and up and back and back. Colors might be hard to accept if one hasn't seen (like our discussions about sunsets and even just the brilliant blue of western, dry air). Super job on the exposure IMO, Chuck, and more interesting with the shadows than if full sun, I expect.

A super presentation for those who are just getting into raw and pp!

(edit - the crop is very nice too!)

Thanks, Linda. I recently began using a cool feature that I knew about but forgot: pressing Command or Control and using the + and - keys to enlarge or reduce the size of the entire page. It allows one to "step back" and view an entire picture at once. Scrolling is a nuisance and you don't see the literal big picture. To quickly return to your normal setting you hold down Command or Control and press the zero key. Those controls also work in Lightroom and Photoshop.

I did shamelessly enhance the colors in those rocks. I remember being able to see the colors when I was there but they are subtle, like the colors in a sheen of oil on water, so the only way I could recreate what I "saw" was to punch up things with saturation and HSL and whatever. 8~
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Re: Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby LindaShorey » Wed Oct 25, 2017 11:26 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:Thanks, Linda. I recently began using a cool feature that I knew about but forgot: pressing Command or Control and using the + and - keys to enlarge or reduce the size of the entire page...


I have to do that constantly on this site, one of the drawbacks to not having photo thumbnails (the only drawback, really). I tried setting the Chromebook to extra-large font but sometimes that distorts pages that have links, buttons, tabs etc (retail and banks for example) to un-usable. I currently have this page zoomed to 150% and the text is barely large enough for me to read comfortably :(
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Re: Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby davechinn » Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:56 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:This is in editing because the three pictures displayed here have been reworked in Lightroom from the original file this morning. The original picture is a raw capture from my Nikon P7800, made in September 2015. We took a couple of weeks and made part of the Lake Superior Circle.

Rainbow Falls Provincial Park has many falls, this one perhaps less spectacular than some, but I noted from signage here that this one was called rainbow not for the usual reason but for the brilliant colors of its wet rocks. I had a time getting down here (Daphne stayed safely up on a bench) and it was probably nuts of me to risk a broken leg getting out on wet rocks but we all knows we goes where the pitcher is. I am open to comment and gentle criticism :|

We were there around 6-ish, golden hour, but I hadn't figured on the sun putting half of the creek in bright sun and the other half in deep shadow. I was glad that I'd spent that entire year shooting everything in raw and learning to work in Lightroom, but I was still cautious not to overexpose the brilliant whites of the foaming current. Shooting hand held while crouched on wet rocks next to a boiling rapid I kept the shutter high, besides which I honestly don't care much for the silky water look. I this it's becoming somewhat cliched and besides, shouldn't a rapid look like a rapid? Anyway, the subject of the picture I was making was the rocks.

My original effort at PP is the middle one. This morning's is last. I feel there is considerable improvement in two years.


A two week tour for a partial Lake Superior Circle sounds, Ohh so exciting Chuck !!! I can relate so well to putting oneself in a dangerous situation to get the shot. While visiting Bar Harbor, Maine I ventured out (alone) before daybreak to capture Bass Harbor Lighthouse. If you are familiar with that lighthouse, then you know about all the rock formation. I won't go any further in detail in hopes that you know where I'm going with this, so I can understand the situation you were in to gets the picture.

Of all the photo edits you posted, the last one is by far the one I choose as a favorite. Its not so much over saturated and the point of view/angle is more pleasing to my eye. Yes, a higher shutter stops the action of the water and while you presented it this way being your personal choice. I too, not much of a fan where we see milky water, but for some reason I still do it, only to get a balance between the two. I hope that makes sense? All in all, this is one I would have hanging on a wall.
Dave

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Charles Haacker
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Re: Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby Charles Haacker » Thu Oct 26, 2017 3:29 pm

davechinn wrote:A two week tour for a partial Lake Superior Circle sounds, Ohh so exciting Chuck !!! I can relate so well to putting oneself in a dangerous situation to get the shot. While visiting Bar Harbor, Maine I ventured out (alone) before daybreak to capture Bass Harbor Lighthouse. If you are familiar with that lighthouse, then you know about all the rock formation. I won't go any further in detail in hopes that you know where I'm going with this, so I can understand the situation you were in to gets the picture.

Of all the photo edits you posted, the last one is by far the one I choose as a favorite. Its not so much over saturated and the point of view/angle is more pleasing to my eye. Yes, a higher shutter stops the action of the water and while you presented it this way being your personal choice. I too, not much of a fan where we see milky water, but for some reason I still do it, only to get a balance between the two. I hope that makes sense? All in all, this is one I would have hanging on a wall.
Dave

Thank you, Dave. By the last one do you mean the square crop? I am liking that one better and better myself.

I have to confess that the last time I was in Maine I was a small boy so no, I don't know the location, but it only took a few seconds to look it up and OMG! Bouldering much? Plus carrying gear and probably a tripod before dawn? Scare-EEE! I bet we'd all like to see what you got if you still have it.

The milky water thing: absolutely you make sense. There can be a compromise. It doesn't have to look either frozen or like tapioca. My problem is that I so rarely have a tripod with me. I always have one in the car, but it's still in the car when I am out on a trail someplace because it's kindofa nuisance to carry but not use. In this instance Daphne was waiting at the top of the trail and the car was parked somewhere beyond that. It wasn't so far that I couldn't have climbed back up, gotten it and climbed back down, but I was already there, teetering on wet rocks, so I said t'heck with it and shot it hand held. I think it was something like a 350th on account of my feeling dangerously unstable where I was so it really froze the splashes pretty well, but I still really like it that way.
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Re: Rainbow Falls, Ontario Provincial Park

Postby davechinn » Thu Oct 26, 2017 4:59 pm

Yes Chuck, the square crop is the one I'm referring to. I totally understand the tripod issue and have been in similar predicaments. I do still have the images and may post in a separate thread. I actually did take a tumble at Cape Neddick Light also known as Nubble Lighthouse. Slipped on wet rocks with camera in hand, that you speak of.
Dave


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