"One day you are a signature, next day you are an autograph." —Billy Wilder

Places ShowcaseHomestead National Monument, Beatrice, Nebraska

Post Reply
User avatar
Charles Haacker
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1841
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 7:20 pm
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Homestead National Monument, Beatrice, Nebraska

Post by Charles Haacker » Thu May 17, 2018 3:55 pm

The other day we drove an hour south to Beatrice to visit the Homestead National Monument, the only federal park dedicated to the homesteaders who largely peopled the American West opened by Lewis and Clark.

From a purely technical viewpoint both these shots were on the tough side. The tractor was in full shadow so I did pop up the "peanut" flash and used it to help open the shadow, then did the rest in Lightroom. The Wall was an interesting exercise in balancing exposure, DOF, trying to hold detail in the sky... What did we do before Lightroom? :lol:

Image
1945 Allis Chalmers Model C tractor
by Charles Haacker, on Flickr
This tractor is nearly as beat up as the one Matt photographed, but we also know this one's remarkable provenance:
The Homestead National Monument’s newest display is a not-so-new 1945 Allis Chalmers Model C tractor. Most of its original orange color is worn away. The seat is a beat-up wooden box. But this weathered workhorse has a story to tell.

“It’s this tractor that represents the end of our nation’s epic homestead movement,” Homestead National Monument superintendent Mark Engler told an audience at an unveiling ceremony for the tractor last fall. “A tractor that was used by the nation’s last homesteader, Ken Deardorff.”
Read the whole story here: http://netnebraska.org/article/news/111 ... mesteaders from NET, Nebraska’s PBS & NPR Stations
Image
The Living Wall: All the States Affected by the Homestead Act
by Charles Haacker, on Flickr
The wall is a physical representation of the percentage of land successfully homesteaded in each of the 30 states affected, including Alaska, the last. Each steel cutout has a square cut into it representing the land homesteaded in that state until the end of the Act in 1986. About 10% of all the land in the U.S. was homesteaded.
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

User avatar
St3v3M
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 4328
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 1:02 am
Location: 35,000 feet
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by St3v3M » Sun Jun 17, 2018 3:34 am

Charles Haacker wrote:
Thu May 17, 2018 3:55 pm
The other day we drove an hour south to Beatrice to visit the Homestead National Monument, the only federal park dedicated to the homesteaders who largely peopled the American West opened by Lewis and Clark.

From a purely technical viewpoint both these shots were on the tough side. The tractor was in full shadow so I did pop up the "peanut" flash and used it to help open the shadow, then did the rest in Lightroom. The Wall was an interesting exercise in balancing exposure, DOF, trying to hold detail in the sky... What did we do before Lightroom? :lol:
...
It's wonderful that they left the chains on the tractor, but I especially like the living wall. S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

User avatar
Charles Haacker
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1841
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 7:20 pm
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Post by Charles Haacker » Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:51 pm

St3v3M wrote:
Sun Jun 17, 2018 3:34 am
It's wonderful that they left the chains on the tractor, but I especially like the living wall. S-
Thanks, Steve. The guy had put the chains on because he was trying to pull stumps on his property with the tractor, but the tractor wasn't up to it. He tried everything, let air out of the tires, put extra weight on the front, but every time the stump would win and he would nearly go over backwards, which with a tractor that had no tip prevention or roll bar could have been fatal. He retired that one to a spot on the ground and got a more powerful machine, but despite its great age and being abandoned for many years it was in remarkable shape. They had to airlift it out! Amazing story. :D
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

User avatar
St3v3M
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 4328
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 1:02 am
Location: 35,000 feet
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by St3v3M » Tue Jun 19, 2018 4:08 am

Charles Haacker wrote:
Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:51 pm
Thanks, Steve. The guy had put the chains on because he was trying to pull stumps on his property with the tractor, but the tractor wasn't up to it. He tried everything, let air out of the tires, put extra weight on the front, but every time the stump would win and he would nearly go over backwards, which with a tractor that had no tip prevention or roll bar could have been fatal. He retired that one to a spot on the ground and got a more powerful machine, but despite its great age and being abandoned for many years it was in remarkable shape. They had to airlift it out! Amazing story. :D
Wow, thank you for adding this! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest