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Places Showcase"Your Kind Is Not Welcome Here"

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St3v3M
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Re: "Your Kind Is Not Welcome Here"

Post by St3v3M » Fri Jan 12, 2018 7:05 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:55 am
... But they are birds! Lions hang with lions. Gnus hang with gnus. ...
Your story reminds me of another I'll share.

When I was invited to South Africa I was gifted a weekend at a Game Ranch. The story is one told by our Park Ranger who was explaining animal behavior. Throughout the day we noticed wildebeest with wildebeest, zebra with zebra, springbok with springbok, but as it got later in the day you could see herds gathering together almost as if they had planned it. In some cases though we found a single zebra mixed with the wildebeast or a springbok hiding amongst the zebra. By the way, they say ZEBra, Vildebeast, and ElEfant. It's wonderful!

We asked about this and the Ranger said, animals like other animals that look like them, it makes them feel safe, but when it gets dark it all changes, it's about numbers and you find the biggest group you can hoping they will protect you from the lions. He went on to say how some animals have learned to use other animals, for instance a lot of animals will congregate with the giraffe as they make wonderful lookouts and can warn a herd before the lions get a chance to get too close. Some animals like the elephant will even defend other animals when they hear a distress call. I've heard dolphins do the same and have even saved a human or two!

I've been blessed to have met some of the right people at the right time, and be in the right place at the right time, and I can see now how it's changed my life. Maybe I am who I am by way of birth, maybe I learned it along the way, but there are three key events in my life that have shaped me for the better. Being thrust into a third-world country at a tender age and seeing how the rest of the world lives, watching my son being born and knowing there's more to life than sadness, and being gifted a chance to be with the animals and knowing I am a part of them as much as I am separate from them.

Life is an amazing thing, with sadness that breaks my heart, but there's beauty here too, the beauty of knowing a small springbok is welcome to hide amongst the zebra, beauty to know to know the joy of a child, and beauty to know for all our differences we are really all the same! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by St3v3M » Fri Jan 12, 2018 7:22 pm

minniev wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 3:09 am
I had not seen today’s news before I posted this, but it is no surprise, only a continuation of the sad journey we’ve lately been on, which I think is a journey backwards into errors of the past.
There's an evil there I do not understand, but there's also the beginning of a conversation and the awakening of our society against injustice that's beginning to take shape and is a beautiful thing to watch. Life has a balance, and where there is evil there is good, we need to stand up and be counted, stand up and be heard, and take a stand for change for the better.

You see it in the #MeToo movement, you see it in the vote, you see it in this conversation, but we need more, we need to foster it, to encourage it, to feed it, and help it grow. We need to use our voice that others may hear, our art that others may see and join in.

Thank you for this conversation! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by St3v3M » Fri Jan 12, 2018 7:30 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 6:27 pm
...
Dalai Lama: “If you can, help and serve others, but if you can’t at least don’t harm them; then in the end you will feel no regret.”
  • First do no harm.
  • Be kind.
  • Walk a mile...
See? Simple. :)
Live by The Golden Rule or die by the sword you bring to the fight. S-
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Post by minniev » Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:30 pm

PietFrancke wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:08 pm

The poor need hope. They need tolerance, they need a pathway to success, they need a dream. They need the very things that our country used to stand for!
I confess it scares and disappoints me that the tolerance and dreams and hope seem out of fashion, replaced with bigotry, anger and fear. And it's particularly scary that the country I thought I knew fell away so quickly like a stage set dropped below-stage and replaced with another.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by minniev » Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:38 pm

St3v3M wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 6:04 pm
The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum looks wonderful and is and is a needed commentary to the history of our country and those still living in economic and social injustice. To be honest, I'm surprised a museum like this was built in The South, especially at a time when we're tearing down the Confederate past, but I also find beauty in the idea that it was and was done well. This is definitely a must visit!

Isn't it amazing how like congregates with like? It's a survival instinct meant to keep us alive, but you'd think with all our social grace we would have transcended it by now. Your image is the classic white against black, big against small, aggressive against less, but it goes even further. I've seen it in your birds too, the whites dominating the blues and I'm sure it extends from there. You expect the alpha, it's a genetic thing that has helped the species keep the strongest bloodlines, but you would think birds would accept other birds, humans other humans. S-
The museum is wonderful. It was typical Mississippi politics that we have it. Haley Barbour, the prior governor, is a powerful lobbyist in DC, and briefly considered a run for president prior to the last election. The museum was a bargaining chip for political support in that eventuality. He actually got it passed was legislation before he left office, so the current governor couldn't undo it. Regardless of the reasons behind it, it is a treasure.

I toyed with the notion of creating a Whites Only sign in Photoshop and hanging off the pelicans' log, and a sign that said "Colored" for the cormorants. I grew up with those signs everywhere, and asked lots of questions about them as a child. I'm glad the signs now are confined to museum exhibits but it troubles me that the mindset behind those signs has become resurgent with a strange acceptance.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by Charles Haacker » Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:59 pm

St3v3M wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 7:02 pm
Charles Haacker wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:55 am
...
So far as I know (and I ain't a biologist nor a ornithologist) if you cross a pelican with a cormorant you will get a pelicant (or is it a cormoran?). It will be a flightless bird with hairy feathers.
...
What do you get when you cross an elephant with a rhino? Elephino
Y' 'ave t'say that wiv a workin' class accent, y'know. :D
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Post by Charles Haacker » Fri Jan 12, 2018 10:03 pm

St3v3M wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 7:05 pm
Charles Haacker wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:55 am
... But they are birds! Lions hang with lions. Gnus hang with gnus. ...
Your story reminds me of another I'll share.

When I was invited to South Africa I was gifted a weekend at a Game Ranch. The story is one told by our Park Ranger who was explaining animal behavior. Throughout the day we noticed wildebeest with wildebeest, zebra with zebra, springbok with springbok, but as it got later in the day you could see herds gathering together almost as if they had planned it. In some cases though we found a single zebra mixed with the wildebeast or a springbok hiding amongst the zebra. By the way, they say ZEBra, Vildebeast, and ElEfant. It's wonderful!

We asked about this and the Ranger said, animals like other animals that look like them, it makes them feel safe, but when it gets dark it all changes, it's about numbers and you find the biggest group you can hoping they will protect you from the lions. He went on to say how some animals have learned to use other animals, for instance a lot of animals will congregate with the giraffe as they make wonderful lookouts and can warn a herd before the lions get a chance to get too close. Some animals like the elephant will even defend other animals when they hear a distress call. I've heard dolphins do the same and have even saved a human or two!

I've been blessed to have met some of the right people at the right time, and be in the right place at the right time, and I can see now how it's changed my life. Maybe I am who I am by way of birth, maybe I learned it along the way, but there are three key events in my life that have shaped me for the better. Being thrust into a third-world country at a tender age and seeing how the rest of the world lives, watching my son being born and knowing there's more to life than sadness, and being gifted a chance to be with the animals and knowing I am a part of them as much as I am separate from them.

Life is an amazing thing, with sadness that breaks my heart, but there's beauty here too, the beauty of knowing a small springbok is welcome to hide amongst the zebra, beauty to know to know the joy of a child, and beauty to know for all our differences we are really all the same! S-
What a wonderful, heartwarming story. I did not know this! (Incidentally I love the sound of the South African accent, especially the ones with Africaans undertones; its melodic.)
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Post by Charles Haacker » Fri Jan 12, 2018 10:44 pm

minniev wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:30 pm
PietFrancke wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:08 pm

The poor need hope. They need tolerance, they need a pathway to success, they need a dream. They need the very things that our country used to stand for!
I confess it scares and disappoints me that the tolerance and dreams and hope seem out of fashion, replaced with bigotry, anger and fear. And it's particularly scary that the country I thought I knew fell away so quickly like a stage set dropped below-stage and replaced with another.
I think some of that may be explained by the despised "political correctness" having kept a lid on while the pressure built. I suspect the ignorance, fear, and bigotry never went away but was peeking out from beneath the steaming rim of the lid of PC until some guy comes along and rips off the lid and screams, There, it's OKAY now to say what you really think!" FOOM! It's like he knocked the bung out of the barrel and ye gods, where the hell did that come from? I read and hear so much anymore that I can't recall where I heard it, but someone said that it needed to be acknowledged that for many, many lower income white people, well, Piet said it really well:
Piet wrote:The poor need hope. They need tolerance, they need a pathway to success, they need a dream. They need the very things that our country used to stand for!
That applies to all poor of any so-called "race." The people who have nowhere to go but watch their main streets dry up and blow away on the winds of change are desperate. They are hurting terribly, and hurting people want to find someone whose fault it is that they are hurting. The mills closed. The mines closed. Coal was our life but "they" say it's poison (Just for example). Who's "they?" "They" are perceived to be the coastal and northern "elite," the "effete elite" who don't care about "ordinary" people. Meanwhile there is a perception that jobs they used to have have either gone to "blacks" or "refugees" or "ILLEGALS" (illegals have stolen 2/3 of all the jobs in the country didn't you know?) ... And MUSLIMS! Ye gods and little fishhooks they ATTACKED us, yet here we are letting them in by the thousands and half of them are terrorists and the other half are taking our jobs! They don't look like us or sound like us or even worship God! And don't get me started again on the Illegals. President Trump promised me a WALL to protect my job and family and community. YES I WANT MY PROMISED WALL!

Yes, I have empathy for them, too, even though I guess I'm an effete elite on Social Security. (N) They hurt! They fear! I get it! But hurting and fearing and hating will not do one single thing to mitigate the problems, nor will "leadership" pandering to the hate and fear. This is where I get totally lost; I thought we had a handle on it. Guess not.
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
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All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Post by Charles Haacker » Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:01 pm

minniev wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:38 pm
St3v3M wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 6:04 pm
The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum looks wonderful and is and is a needed commentary to the history of our country and those still living in economic and social injustice. To be honest, I'm surprised a museum like this was built in The South, especially at a time when we're tearing down the Confederate past, but I also find beauty in the idea that it was and was done well. This is definitely a must visit!

Isn't it amazing how like congregates with like? It's a survival instinct meant to keep us alive, but you'd think with all our social grace we would have transcended it by now. Your image is the classic white against black, big against small, aggressive against less, but it goes even further. I've seen it in your birds too, the whites dominating the blues and I'm sure it extends from there. You expect the alpha, it's a genetic thing that has helped the species keep the strongest bloodlines, but you would think birds would accept other birds, humans other humans. S-
The museum is wonderful. It was typical Mississippi politics that we have it. Haley Barbour, the prior governor, is a powerful lobbyist in DC, and briefly considered a run for president prior to the last election. The museum was a bargaining chip for political support in that eventuality. He actually got it passed was legislation before he left office, so the current governor couldn't undo it. Regardless of the reasons behind it, it is a treasure.

I toyed with the notion of creating a Whites Only sign in Photoshop and hanging off the pelicans' log, and a sign that said "Colored" for the cormorants. I grew up with those signs everywhere, and asked lots of questions about them as a child. I'm glad the signs now are confined to museum exhibits but it troubles me that the mindset behind those signs has become resurgent with a strange acceptance.
150 years ago the Civil War "settled the issue!" Black chattel slavery was over forever! So somebody figured out how to Jim Crow.

50-ish years ago Civil Rights "settled the issue" after 100 years of Jim Crow.

The Moral Arc bends toward justice. Slooooowly.

Maybe it's not completely crazy to wonder if that guy did us a favor by ripping the scab off of so-called PC? We always knew the bigotry and hate was there. Maybe airing it out gives us a chance to (eventually) have another dialogue about race and hate. None of us will live to see a day when no one even notices skin color, or a bright hijab, or a yarmulke, or whatever that still manages to divide and conquer us today. Our children won't. Maybe our grandchildren... The moral arc bends slowly because that is human nature, and as a species we are ridiculously young, just kids on the playground figuring it out.
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Post by Duck » Sat Jan 13, 2018 12:49 am

minniev wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:38 pm
I toyed with the notion of creating a Whites Only sign in Photoshop and hanging off the pelicans' log, and a sign that said "Colored" for the cormorants. I grew up with those signs everywhere, and asked lots of questions about them as a child. I'm glad the signs now are confined to museum exhibits but it troubles me that the mindset behind those signs has become resurgent with a strange acceptance.

When I first opened my tattoo shop I decorated the walls with some typical "tattoo shop" style signs; "If your Shopping, I'm not Selling", "Good tattoos aren't cheap. Cheap tattoos aren't good" and "Tipping isn't a town in China". I created one that said; "Colored people only. Or those who are about to be colored". I thought it was hilarious but I was cautioned not to hang that particular one up as it may be taken the wrong way. "Screw 'em if they can't take a joke." was my mentality but I deferred to their counsel and never put it up. (?)

PC can be a touchy subject so it's probably wise to be safe than funny.
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