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People ShowcaseWhere the bicycle is king

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Graham Smith
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Where the bicycle is king

Post by Graham Smith » Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:33 pm

A view of Sarenga market.
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minniev
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Post by minniev » Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:04 pm

Gee, you've got great leading lines all over the place, Graham, in addition to an engaging photo of culture and geography. And that's before you even get to the bicycles! They sort of "roll" us through the scene. Very nice.
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Post by Graham Smith » Tue Feb 13, 2018 5:55 pm

minniev wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:04 pm
Gee, you've got great leading lines all over the place, Graham, in addition to an engaging photo of culture and geography. And that's before you even get to the bicycles! They sort of "roll" us through the scene. Very nice.
Thanks Minnie. As an aside, the bicycle played a major part in the development of rural India. Up until the introduction of the bicycle villages were very isolated, any communication was either on foot or at the speed of animal drawn transport a bullock cart or perhaps mule of donkey. With the advent of the bicycle villagers could travel to villages further afield. Education improved as both teachers could set up schools and pupils could access them.

There was another benefit claimed for the bicycle. It widened the gene pool. Previously all marriage was usually within the village or a neighbouring one.
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Post by mcveed » Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:35 pm

Great image, Graham. Wonderful composition - studied yet natural. Interesting note on the significance of the bicycle. My wife had a bicycle that was made in India some years ago - built like a tank, almost as good as my Dutch 'Fongers'.

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Post by Matt Quinn » Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:16 pm

Great photo and info, Graham. Little things mean a lot; the humble bicycle prompted major changes, even improvements. One wonders what the Internet will eventually create there.

A point of curiosity; I note that several people are looking at you and you seem to be shooting from the middle of the road. Do you use a tripod? Do you take quick snaps or do you frame and wait for the moment? Where there is the lineup of people, I know it was 'posed.' Here I am unsure. Thanks. Matt
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Graham Smith
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Post by Graham Smith » Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:06 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:16 pm
Great photo and info, Graham. Little things mean a lot; the humble bicycle prompted major changes, even improvements. One wonders what the Internet will eventually create there.

A point of curiosity; I note that several people are looking at you and you seem to be shooting from the middle of the road. Do you use a tripod? Do you take quick snaps or do you frame and wait for the moment? Where there is the lineup of people, I know it was 'posed.' Here I am unsure. Thanks. Matt
Matt, there is only cycle and the occasion motorcycle use that section of road.. and perhaps the occasional delivery truck. The locals just walk down the roads... and trust to luck. there are no laws regarding pedestrians and what there are for motor vehicles are completely ignored. :D

I never use a tripod, it's too restricting for this type of photography. You have to be quick but considered, I'm constantly on the move watching for things to develop. I could have stood anywhere for this shot and it would have worked.

I never pose people, it is the way the arranged themselves, the way they want to be seen. I doubt they see Europeans much more than once a month, if that, they all want to have their picture taken and are quite happy just to see it on the back of the camera. They want, even more, to take a selfie with you.. there must be thousands of selfies of me in India.
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Post by Graham Smith » Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:26 pm

Matt, this is one of the main streets through Sarenga. There are no footpaths for pedestrians and those trucks, together with buses and tractors and trailers are a continuous stream The trucks don't slow down, I guess they are moving at around 30mph, the driver has his hand continually on the horn as do all other vehicles, it's a cacophony of noise. It's Bedlam.
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Post by Graham Smith » Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:12 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:16 pm
Great photo and info, Graham. Little things mean a lot; the humble bicycle prompted major changes, even improvements. One wonders what the Internet will eventually create there.

A point of curiosity; I note that several people are looking at you and you seem to be shooting from the middle of the road. Do you use a tripod? Do you take quick snaps or do you frame and wait for the moment? Where there is the lineup of people, I know it was 'posed.' Here I am unsure. Thanks. Matt
The internet is very good out there, for which they mainly use smart phones. The cellular networks are second to none. The Government put huge sums into creating the network and making phones affordable. Their reasoning being that remote villages, where villagers would have to travel, sometimes for days, to visit Government offices would be able to do all of their form filling online. Also it brought medical help closer time wise. I often hear the question "Why are India launching rockets into space when they have so much poverty"? The answer is to create a comprehensive cellular network to make the country easier to run.
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Post by Matt Quinn » Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:02 pm

Thanks, Graham. These scenes remind me of my years in a remote town in the Philippines in the '60s. The streets were dirtier with horse droppings all around; the main means of moving around was a horse-drawn carriage (kalesa) that rarely stopped for passengers but merely slowed, so you grabbed a pole, swung on and stuffed yourself between the others. You passed your fare up through the others. And when you got where you wanted, you swung off. Doubt very much I could do it now.

We could learn a lot about cellular planning from India, if we were open to learning, I guess. Thanks again. Matt
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Post by LindaShorey » Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:39 pm

Fascinating information and photos, Graham. Thanks so much!
"What's important in a photograph and what isn't." http://photographylife.com/whats-import ... -what-isnt

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