Welcome new members. If you have been recently invited to join our forum, welcome.
Please take a few minutes to introduce yourself at The Meeting Room / General Discussions / Introduce yourself

Photography Discussionartistic principles

Photography related discussions with a slant towards learning and understanding the art and craft of photography
User avatar
Psjunkie
Mentoris Maximus
Mentoris Maximus
Posts: 2988
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 4:20 am
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Re: artistic principles

Post by Psjunkie »

I don't have much trouble it seems...

User avatar
St3v3M
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 4973
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 1:02 am
Location: 35,000 feet
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by St3v3M »

Psjunkie wrote:
Tue Feb 25, 2020 2:44 pm
I'm loving getting the (cliff notes) errr I mean Piet notes!!
I was thinking the same and am excited to read the book now! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

User avatar
St3v3M
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 4973
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 1:02 am
Location: 35,000 feet
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by St3v3M »

minniev wrote:
Tue Feb 25, 2020 3:28 pm
This is a slow slog but it is fascinating. And it's a free download. https://archive.org/details/ArtAndVisua ... n/mode/2up.

I only took one photography workshop in real life, and it was from my favorite photographer Guy Tal. Taking photos alongside him cemented me into photography as an art form. He recommended this as the most essential book a photographer could read.
Thank you for this! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

User avatar
St3v3M
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 4973
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 1:02 am
Location: 35,000 feet
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by St3v3M »

PietFrancke wrote:
Mon Feb 24, 2020 1:02 am
So I read somewhere that Robert Beverly Hale's Drawing Lessons from the Great Masters was very worthwhile. ...

Please share the artistic principles that You know of that You find interesting - just keep the numbers goings
Thank you for this! I love first-hand accounts and am excited to read this because of your reviews! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

User avatar
St3v3M
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 4973
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 1:02 am
Location: 35,000 feet
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by St3v3M »

This reminds of an article I read some time back about when artists discovered how to paint with perspective.

when painters discovered perspective
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

User avatar
PietFrancke
Mentoris Magnus
Mentoris Magnus
Posts: 2356
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:38 pm
Location: WV
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by PietFrancke »

Artistic Principle 5: "Reflected light adds greatly to roundness and form".

If we had a picture of Steve's naked stomach when he is out hiking in the wilderness - and the stomach was half lit and half in form shadow (Steve's stomach half lit, not Steve half lit), then by adding a line of light in the furthest away dark area, we would be enhancing the "roundness" of his belly. By making Steve's belly rounder, we become more satisfied with the states of our own bellies.

User avatar
St3v3M
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 4973
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 1:02 am
Location: 35,000 feet
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by St3v3M »

PietFrancke wrote:
Thu Feb 27, 2020 3:33 am
Artistic Principle 5: "Reflected light adds greatly to roundness and form".

If we had a picture of Steve's naked stomach when he is out hiking in the wilderness - and the stomach was half lit and half in form shadow (Steve's stomach half lit, not Steve half lit), then by adding a line of light in the furthest away dark area, we would be enhancing the "roundness" of his belly. By making Steve's belly rounder, we become more satisfied with the states of our own bellies.
It's not often I laugh out loud, and I don't think you want to see that, no one does! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

User avatar
minniev
Mentoris Supremus
Mentoris Supremus
Posts: 5905
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 3:55 am
Location: Mississippi
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by minniev »

PietFrancke wrote:
Thu Feb 27, 2020 3:33 am
Artistic Principle 5: "Reflected light adds greatly to roundness and form".

If we had a picture of Steve's naked stomach when he is out hiking in the wilderness - and the stomach was half lit and half in form shadow (Steve's stomach half lit, not Steve half lit), then by adding a line of light in the furthest away dark area, we would be enhancing the "roundness" of his belly. By making Steve's belly rounder, we become more satisfied with the states of our own bellies.
A brilliant explanation...
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

User avatar
PietFrancke
Mentoris Magnus
Mentoris Magnus
Posts: 2356
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:38 pm
Location: WV
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by PietFrancke »

artistic Principle 6: "light is very different from dark and very different from where they meet".

Some considerations when doing post processing - based on the light, different areas call for different treatments, for example:

Highlights - sometimes blown, bright areas with lesser detail - glow - lower texture, lower saturation, less sharpness. Consider adding speckles of noise or light texture so it isn't completely blown out - keep the highlight blown out area small. A larger area might be bright, but won't be all blown out.

Dark areas - sometimes/often noisy in photos, very little detail exists in dark areas, so - for this area - reduce noise, increase saturation, reduce texture and contrast. Add in some reflected light where it makes sense (per my reading, reflected light seldom appears in the everyday photograph - but we can cheat and paint some in anyway). The color cast for this area is likely to be the coolest.

The third contour - the area where light meets dark is the most important. This is where by definition, the light scrapes across the surface. So... Here is where we need the greatest texture, greatest sharpness, some warmth, lots of detail, more contrast. This is the area where the light begins and the shadow ends - but is it not a thin line. Lighter to the light side, and darker to the dark side with a smooth gradual transition from one to the other. (on a box, this is a thin edge, but for gradual curves like a face for example these places exist).

Too much rambling - I need to take a picture of something where these three areas clearly exist and then create masks for each basic area, and then do the different kinds of post processing and constrain the post processing by the masks.

User avatar
Psjunkie
Mentoris Maximus
Mentoris Maximus
Posts: 2988
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 4:20 am
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by Psjunkie »

Just make sure it's not Steve's naked stomach....

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest