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Photography DiscussionA Very Useful Vee Bracket on a Monopod

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Charles Haacker
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A Very Useful Vee Bracket on a Monopod

Post by Charles Haacker » Tue Aug 07, 2018 3:25 pm

I like to be pretty unencumbered, plus there are a lot of places that forbid tripods but some will let you get away with a monopod. Monopods, though, have their own drawbacks (such as not being tripods), and equipping one with some kind of head or camera mount was challenging me. Somewhere tho' I came across photographers adapting a V or Y bracket used by shooters as a gun rest. What attracted me was the extreme flexibility. I can rest the camera horizontally. I can instantly switch to vertical and back. And I can go hand-held instantly. I keep my camera strap around my neck and either use the rig or not, depending.

I ordered mine from Amazon. It looks enormous in the picture but it's actually 3-inches across, easily accommodates pretty much any lens, but allows so much flexibility it ain't funny.

Here's some recent stuff made with its able aid:
Attachments
29845690298_50ebdd1ffe_z.jpg
Made in the available dark (dark!!) of a museum (B-17 engine). Sony ILCE-6000, E PZ 18-105mm F4 G OSS lens @ 47 mm, 1/60 sec @ f/8, ISO 10,000
29845690298_50ebdd1ffe_z.jpg (91.58 KiB) Viewed 81 times
DSC06679-Edit.SHUTMAX.jpg
This is the rig
DSC07233.EMlr.jpg
Phlox after a rain, maybe 4X life size (?) with extension tube. Same camera and lens, 48 mm, 1/80 sec ƒ/11.0 ISO 640
DSC07333.EMlr.jpg
"Naked Lady" (Surprise Lily), same camera and lens with extension tube, 69 mm, 1/125 sec ƒ/8.0 ISO 320. What made this tough was there was a breeze and the flower was moving in random patterns.
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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minniev
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Post by minniev » Tue Aug 07, 2018 4:48 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 3:25 pm
I like to be pretty unencumbered, plus there are a lot of places that forbid tripods but some will let you get away with a monopod. Monopods, though, have their own drawbacks (such as not being tripods), and equipping one with some kind of head or camera mount was challenging me. Somewhere tho' I came across photographers adapting a V or Y bracket used by shooters as a gun rest. What attracted me was the extreme flexibility. I can rest the camera horizontally. I can instantly switch to vertical and back. And I can go hand-held instantly. I keep my camera strap around my neck and either use the rig or not, depending.

I ordered mine from Amazon. It looks enormous in the picture but it's actually 3-inches across, easily accommodates pretty much any lens, but allows so much flexibility it ain't funny.

Here's some recent stuff made with its able aid:
Great tool and you've obviously mastered it! Those are very sharp images. Looks useful for those situations where a tripod is not really helpful (dam birds, for example), or it isn't practical to haul one around, such as my recent trip where all the hikes were on steep inclines and hauling a tripod would have left me in graver peril than I already was.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Aug 08, 2018 6:04 pm

minniev wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 4:48 pm
Great tool and you've obviously mastered it! Those are very sharp images. Looks useful for those situations where a tripod is not really helpful (dam birds, for example), or it isn't practical to haul one around, such as my recent trip where all the hikes were on steep inclines and hauling a tripod would have left me in graver peril than I already was.
Thanks Min. My Polaroid monopod is very sturdy but I would hesitate to throw my weight on it just because it's not intended for that use, but it would certainly help as a steadying third leg. If I still hiked (just can't no more) I might look into one of those adjustable hiking staffs with a 1/4 x 20 thread on top, usually covered by a knob. The V-bracket fits 1/4 x 20 with a comes-with adapter (it fits 3/8 too) and I don't know how much rise or fall the staff has, but the staff is intended for hiking first and photography second so it should be sturdy enough to throw serious weight on it. To me the beauty of the V-bracket is that getting the camera on or off is a matter of lifting it. Nothing to screw or unscrew. Nothing to tilt. Go from horizontal to vertical just like that. Tilt it down or back (I tilted back to get the engine plus my monopod goes to 7-feet, which I got for flexibility again). On the trail you could stop for a breather, put you camera in the Vee, shoot, take it off and move on. I know there are even harnesses for hikers to keep a camera on your chest and not banging around when not in use. :thumbup:
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Post by St3v3M » Wed Aug 22, 2018 6:47 am

Can you think of an advantage of using the bracket versus a ball head? S-
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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Aug 22, 2018 1:12 pm

St3v3M wrote:
Wed Aug 22, 2018 6:47 am
Can you think of an advantage of using the bracket versus a ball head? S-
Oh definitely. For me the problems a ball head creates are several: the camera is difficult to remove, even with a quick release; the camera in a vertical position is awkward and unbalanced; adjusting the height of the monopod has to be done with the mass of the camera on top, risking a devastating fall; changing to a hand-held shot goes back to difficult-to-remove. The V-bracket mitigates all of that without (I'm pretty sure) compromising the added steadiness. It's still a monopod, not a tripod. The camera can still orbit in a circle. The monopod just keeps the camera from moving up or down. Even on a ball or pan head the camera would be no more steady than in the V-bracket. You are still touching the camera and triggering it manually. I keep the steady-shot-vibration-reduction on. I can't see where there would be an advantage to a ball head on a monopod. On a tripod absolutely; but not on a monopod. (By the way I know about L-plates and see a distinct advantage to one on a tripod. I think the V-bracket beats an L-plate on a monopod because mo'fasta'.) :)

My technique is about as simple as can be. The camera is on a neck strap and I have a wrist strap on the monopod so I am totally mobile. I can shoot hand-held. I can bring the monopod up and prop the camera in the Vee. I can rotate the camera from horizontal to vertical and back with the lens barrel in the same spot directly over the center of the monopod. My monopod has quick releases for the sections so it's fast to adjust, and I adjust without the mass of the camera because it just hangs from my neck. Adjusting the height where I want it is easy because I can sight through the Vee like the notch in a gunsight and know exactly where the center of my lens will be! To me, the V-bracket is all advantage (short of using a tripod). 'Course I really hate tripods/ :D :p
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Post by St3v3M » Wed Aug 22, 2018 1:28 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Wed Aug 22, 2018 1:12 pm
Oh definitely. For me the problems a ball head creates are several: the camera is difficult to remove, even with a quick release; the camera in a vertical position is awkward and unbalanced; adjusting the height of the monopod has to be done with the mass of the camera on top, risking a devastating fall; changing to a hand-held shot goes back to difficult-to-remove. The V-bracket mitigates all of that without (I'm pretty sure) compromising the added steadiness. It's still a monopod, not a tripod. The camera can still orbit in a circle. The monopod just keeps the camera from moving up or down. Even on a ball or pan head the camera would be no more steady than in the V-bracket. You are still touching the camera and triggering it manually. I keep the steady-shot-vibration-reduction on. I can't see where there would be an advantage to a ball head on a monopod. On a tripod absolutely; but not on a monopod. (By the way I know about L-plates and see a distinct advantage to one on a tripod. I think the V-bracket beats an L-plate on a monopod because mo'fasta'.) :)

My technique is about as simple as can be. The camera is on a neck strap and I have a wrist strap on the monopod so I am totally mobile. I can shoot hand-held. I can bring the monopod up and prop the camera in the Vee. I can rotate the camera from horizontal to vertical and back with the lens barrel in the same spot directly over the center of the monopod. My monopod has quick releases for the sections so it's fast to adjust, and I adjust without the mass of the camera because it just hangs from my neck. Adjusting the height where I want it is easy because I can sight through the Vee like the notch in a gunsight and know exactly where the center of my lens will be! To me, the V-bracket is all advantage (short of using a tripod). 'Course I really hate tripods/ :D :p
Great tips, thanks! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by pop511 » Sat Aug 25, 2018 3:43 pm

Charles;
Thanks for posting.
ed davis

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PietFrancke
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Post by PietFrancke » Mon Aug 27, 2018 12:28 am

this is an interesting idea..

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