"Don't sit down and wait for the opportunities to come. Get up and make them." —Madam C.J. Walker

Photography DiscussionSharing an Awesome Discovery

Post Reply
User avatar
Charles Haacker
Mentoris Primus
Mentoris Primus
Posts: 1783
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 7:20 pm
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Social Media Opt-In: No
Editing option: No, please do not edit my images
Contact:

Sharing an Awesome Discovery

Post by Charles Haacker » Mon Jun 18, 2018 11:45 pm

I’ve made what I think is an awesome discovery. For the way I shoot it is really very cool, but I doubt my way would work for everyone (maybe not anyone ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ). Nevertheless I’d like to share it because it’s cool, plus I wonder if anyone else's cameras do this.

My go-to “walkaround” settings on my mirrorless Sony A6000 and RX-10 are:
  • Aperture priority
    “Floating” (auto) ISO, sometimes capped, more often not (I can control most noise and anyway some does not bother me that much)
    Auto WB (I am always shooting 100% raw)
    Continuous autofocus
    Lock-on autofocus
    Burst mode, usually mid-range (about 5 fps, sometimes slow, 2 fps, that allows me to make one exposure and stop)
    Walk-around zoom, Sony E PZ 18-105mm F4 G OSS (holds f/4.0 throughout, equivalent 27 mm to 157 mm, pretty much perfect mid-range for anything)
    (The RX-10 has a 24 - 200 equivalent zoom on a 1” sensor. I’m using it very little now, preferring the superior performance of the A6000 with its APS-C half-frame sensor.)
These are the settings I most commonly use, especially when trying to keep up with my 3-year-old-manic-pixie granddaughter. The settings are also broadly useful in many situations and since I usually like to be ready for Andi I just stick with them.

So here’s what I discovered: When in my favorite walkaround settings, the camera AUTOMATICALLY selects a shutter speed roughly double the actual focal length. They do it with incredible consistency, especially since I allow the ISO to “float.” At 18 mm for example the Sonys will almost always select a shutter around 1/40 sec at any aperture since they can also adjust the ISO for the conditions, bright or available dark. Zoom out to 35 mm and the cameras will instantly select a shutter around 1/70 - 1/80 second. Zoom to 105 and glance at the shutter, it will be 1/200. On my A6000 with the 18 - 105 f/4 it matters not where I set the aperture, the camera will consistently double the shutter based on the focal length unless I’m in near darkness (and I do that because I am quite gibbering mad). For a total sharp freak this is utterly AWESOMESAUCE!

The thing that makes this wonderful from my viewpoint is that I can, for the most part, concentrate on composition and action and not worry at all if I am getting well exposed, reasonably sharp pictures. I know how and when to use manual, and I’ve used shutter priority sometimes when I thought it better, but this discovery means that I really don’t need shutter priority -- the camera will handle it for me and having control of DOF is far preferable. All I need do is select an aperture consistent with the DOF I want, zoom or not, and wherever the lens is set the camera will double the focal length for the shutter speed. I think that is SO COOL! :yay:

Examples:
Image
Grampa's Personal Favorite (Centennial Mall Fountain)
by Charles Haacker, on Flickr
At ƒ/5.0 and 80.0 mm the camera selected 1/1000 at ISO 100 because we are in nice bright sun. Note the freezing of the water. The camera nailed the focus on her face. She is running around in a fountain in street clothes getting totally sopped. :rofl: The heat index that day was 104. :S

This one is inside the Children's Museum, the first time she has been able to weigh herself in the bucket as she is now over 30 pounds.
Image
33 Pounds Soaking Wet! Really!
by Charles Haacker, on Flickr
Here, shooting at ƒ/5.6 and zoomed back to 27.0 mm equivalent to 40 mm full frame), the camera selected 1/60 second at ISO 8000. In these cases I apply more noise control, but my intent is always just to get the picture! Sure, I could do all this in manual... And miss a lot of cute shots.

I also volunteer to do occasional event photography. I own but rarely use a flash unit because I hate the look. I'm very much an available dark nut and infinitely prefer to battle noise than lose the look of the natural light. I'm pretty chuffed to have discovered this convenience. :thumbup:
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

User avatar
St3v3M
Key Founding Member
Key Founding Member
Posts: 4052
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 1:02 am
Location: 35,000 feet
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by St3v3M » Tue Jun 19, 2018 5:28 am

Your tempting me to get a newer camera. Thank you for sharing this with us! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

User avatar
minniev
Mentoris Legatus
Mentoris Legatus
Posts: 3210
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 3:55 am
Location: Mississippi
Social Media Opt-In: Yes
Editing option: Yes, feel free to edit my image
Contact:

Post by minniev » Tue Jun 19, 2018 8:49 pm

Charles Haacker wrote:
Mon Jun 18, 2018 11:45 pm
I’ve made what I think is an awesome discovery. For the way I shoot it is really very cool, but I doubt my way would work for everyone (maybe not anyone ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ). Nevertheless I’d like to share it because it’s cool, plus I wonder if anyone else's cameras do this.

My go-to “walkaround” settings on my mirrorless Sony A6000 and RX-10 are:
  • Aperture priority
    “Floating” (auto) ISO, sometimes capped, more often not (I can control most noise and anyway some does not bother me that much)
    Auto WB (I am always shooting 100% raw)
    Continuous autofocus
    Lock-on autofocus
    Burst mode, usually mid-range (about 5 fps, sometimes slow, 2 fps, that allows me to make one exposure and stop)
    Walk-around zoom, Sony E PZ 18-105mm F4 G OSS (holds f/4.0 throughout, equivalent 27 mm to 157 mm, pretty much perfect mid-range for anything)
    (The RX-10 has a 24 - 200 equivalent zoom on a 1” sensor. I’m using it very little now, preferring the superior performance of the A6000 with its APS-C half-frame sensor.)
These are the settings I most commonly use, especially when trying to keep up with my 3-year-old-manic-pixie granddaughter. The settings are also broadly useful in many situations and since I usually like to be ready for Andi I just stick with them.

So here’s what I discovered: When in my favorite walkaround settings, the camera AUTOMATICALLY selects a shutter speed roughly double the actual focal length. They do it with incredible consistency, especially since I allow the ISO to “float.” At 18 mm for example the Sonys will almost always select a shutter around 1/40 sec at any aperture since they can also adjust the ISO for the conditions, bright or available dark. Zoom out to 35 mm and the cameras will instantly select a shutter around 1/70 - 1/80 second. Zoom to 105 and glance at the shutter, it will be 1/200. On my A6000 with the 18 - 105 f/4 it matters not where I set the aperture, the camera will consistently double the shutter based on the focal length unless I’m in near darkness (and I do that because I am quite gibbering mad). For a total sharp freak this is utterly AWESOMESAUCE!

The thing that makes this wonderful from my viewpoint is that I can, for the most part, concentrate on composition and action and not worry at all if I am getting well exposed, reasonably sharp pictures. I know how and when to use manual, and I’ve used shutter priority sometimes when I thought it better, but this discovery means that I really don’t need shutter priority -- the camera will handle it for me and having control of DOF is far preferable. All I need do is select an aperture consistent with the DOF I want, zoom or not, and wherever the lens is set the camera will double the focal length for the shutter speed. I think that is SO COOL! :yay:

Examples:
Image
Grampa's Personal Favorite (Centennial Mall Fountain)
by Charles Haacker, on Flickr
At ƒ/5.0 and 80.0 mm the camera selected 1/1000 at ISO 100 because we are in nice bright sun. Note the freezing of the water. The camera nailed the focus on her face. She is running around in a fountain in street clothes getting totally sopped. :rofl: The heat index that day was 104. :S

This one is inside the Children's Museum, the first time she has been able to weigh herself in the bucket as she is now over 30 pounds.
Image
33 Pounds Soaking Wet! Really!
by Charles Haacker, on Flickr
Here, shooting at ƒ/5.6 and zoomed back to 27.0 mm equivalent to 40 mm full frame), the camera selected 1/60 second at ISO 8000. In these cases I apply more noise control, but my intent is always just to get the picture! Sure, I could do all this in manual... And miss a lot of cute shots.

I also volunteer to do occasional event photography. I own but rarely use a flash unit because I hate the look. I'm very much an available dark nut and infinitely prefer to battle noise than lose the look of the natural light. I'm pretty chuffed to have discovered this convenience. :thumbup:
This is interesting info. While I don't have a Sony, I will have to pay more attention to my Oly's choices and see if there are patterns I haven't figured out. Mostly, I'm unhappy with the slower speeds if I'm chasing grandkids or birds, so then shoot on shutter priority with auto ISO and maximum values for the ISO. If there are clear patterns, I might have other options. I'm with you on flash, just don't like it unless handled in a studio by a pro. Since I don't have a studio and everything is shot on the fly, I have to do something else.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests