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Photography DiscussionMy new challenge: shooting in manual only.

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Psjunkie
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Re: My new challenge: shooting in manual only.

Post by Psjunkie » Thu Apr 19, 2018 3:45 pm

That was an image I captured Matt......and I am almost ashamed to admit it but I don't know how to use any of the other modes on my camera other than manual...I've never taken time to read about them.

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Post by St3v3M » Thu Apr 19, 2018 7:30 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:
Thu Apr 19, 2018 3:12 pm
"I'm curious though, I know you're just getting into this, but what do you think of it? S"

It's a muddle right now. I keep forgetting one of the three legs and just fire away, hoping for salvation in pp. Then I pause, breathe, and try what Duck and Chuck have recommended. I don't keep notes on what I am doing so I can't reflect and learn from what I have done once I see the results on the screen. I blame all this on the seduction of digital--scatter shoot, hope, then choose. No new tricks for this old dog, I am afraid. Maybe today, though. Maybe...

I seem to recall a photo I thought was yours of an aisle on a train, windows to the left, compartments to the right, that you, if it was you, wrote that you took in manual because you always shoot in manual. MATT
I recently set my camera to Back Buton Focus totally disabling the focus function of the Shutter, so there I am in the Mojave National Preserve looking at things I'll probably never see again and taking pictures as I normally would. It wasn't until the second feature that I remembered I had modified my camera and wasn't focusing those precious first shots. I think we all get seduced by the digital revolution sometimes, especially with the thought that we can save it in post, but eventually we learn it isn't always as easy as it sounds and learn to use the tools we have the best way we can. Photography is a learning adventure and that makes us all the better! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by minniev » Thu Apr 19, 2018 7:33 pm

I am glad Frank brought that up. I do not have a clue how to use the Program mode on my camera. I can and do use the others, but for me, Manual is so much easier because I control everything and I'm not likely to end up with a bad surprise because the camera picked something I wouldn't have picked. I pick the aperture and shutter, and if the exposure is too dark, I decide whether to alter the ISO or make a devil's bargain with the other settings. If I'm handholding, there are physical limits to the bargains I'll make with shutter speed, but that's my first choice if I'm using a tripod. My camera is an m43, so I can bargain more with aperture than some of you can, especially with landscape shots.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by St3v3M » Thu Apr 19, 2018 7:41 pm

I think it's good to learn to shoot in Manual, but not at the expense of your images. Work with it until you feel comfortable if only to learn how the camera sees, then decide what's best for you and the situations you're shooting in. S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by Matt Quinn » Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:51 pm

Psjunkie wrote:
Thu Apr 19, 2018 3:45 pm
That was an image I captured Matt......and I am almost ashamed to admit it but I don't know how to use any of the other modes on my camera other than manual...I've never taken time to read about them.
Apologies, apologies, apologies over and over again. Rattling along here, so a generous pardon would soothe my day and my crippled conscience. Matt
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"One should really use the camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind." Dorothea Lange

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Post by St3v3M » Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:53 pm

Matt Quinn wrote:
Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:51 pm
Apologies, apologies, apologies over and over again. Rattling along here, so a generous pardon would soothe my day and my crippled conscience. Matt
I doubt apologies are necessary with family! Isn't it interesting though how we all get to the same place different ways! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Post by Psjunkie » Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:59 pm

No apologies needed whatsoever Matt, ....only reason I mentioned it was my embarrassing lack of knowledge about my camera.

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Steven G Webb
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Post by Steven G Webb » Fri Apr 20, 2018 4:58 am

Matt Quinn wrote:
Thu Apr 19, 2018 3:12 pm
I don't keep notes on what I am doing so I can't reflect and learn from what I have done once I see the results on the screen. I blame all this on the seduction of digital--scatter shoot, hope, then choose. No new tricks for this old dog, I am afraid. Maybe today, though. Maybe...
MATT
The drug store where I carried my rolls, and later cartridges of exposed film for processing sold pocket memo pads known as "Photographer's Notebook". Inside were pages with blanks to record pertinent data on each frame of film. Time of day, shutter speed, aperture, film speed and rating (we often rated ASA160 film as ASA100) and other such information. Because we had to wait as much as a week to get negatives and prints back often forgotten details about the exposure needed to be jotted down, especially for learning photographers.

We don't so much need those notebooks (though they would be a kick) because much of the information is recorded as part of the image. Your EXIF can be a wealth of information. Particularly if you are doing autopsy work on photos your three primary elements to the exposure will be there. You can often find a weakness in an image and relate it to which part of the exposure triangle might have been a contributor.

Hope this helps.
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St3v3M
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Post by St3v3M » Fri Apr 20, 2018 5:08 am

Steven G Webb wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 4:58 am
The drug store where I carried my rolls, and later cartridges of exposed film for processing sold pocket memo pads known as "Photographer's Notebook". Inside were pages with blanks to record pertinent data on each frame of film. Time of day, shutter speed, aperture, film speed and rating (we often rated ASA160 film as ASA100) and other such information. Because we had to wait as much as a week to get negatives and prints back often forgotten details about the exposure needed to be jotted down, especially for learning photographers.

We don't so much need those notebooks (though they would be a kick) because much of the information is recorded as part of the image. Your EXIF can be a wealth of information. Particularly if you are doing autopsy work on photos your three primary elements to the exposure will be there. You can often find a weakness in an image and relate it to which part of the exposure triangle might have been a contributor.

Hope this helps.
Going back to the basics is always a good idea, and looking at the metadata is a great way to think about what you could have done!

Great advice! Thank you for adding this! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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Matt Quinn
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Post by Matt Quinn » Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:06 pm

Steven G Webb wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 4:58 am
Matt Quinn wrote:
Thu Apr 19, 2018 3:12 pm
I don't keep notes on what I am doing so I can't reflect and learn from what I have done once I see the results on the screen. I blame all this on the seduction of digital--scatter shoot, hope, then choose. No new tricks for this old dog, I am afraid. Maybe today, though. Maybe...
MATT
The drug store where I carried my rolls, and later cartridges of exposed film for processing sold pocket memo pads known as "Photographer's Notebook". Inside were pages with blanks to record pertinent data on each frame of film. Time of day, shutter speed, aperture, film speed and rating (we often rated ASA160 film as ASA100) and other such information. Because we had to wait as much as a week to get negatives and prints back often forgotten details about the exposure needed to be jotted down, especially for learning photographers.

We don't so much need those notebooks (though they would be a kick) because much of the information is recorded as part of the image. Your EXIF can be a wealth of information. Particularly if you are doing autopsy work on photos your three primary elements to the exposure will be there. You can often find a weakness in an image and relate it to which part of the exposure triangle might have been a contributor.

Hope this helps.
Thanks Steven. That helps a lot. I see those data but rarely examine them other than to look at the aperture to ponder dof and the lack thereof. Matt
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"One should really use the camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind." Dorothea Lange

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