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Photography DiscussionDangerous Situations to Get that Photo

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St3v3M
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Re: Dangerous Situations to Get that Photo

Post by St3v3M » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:27 pm

minniev wrote:I love the bear story! And of course it reminded me of one I wanted to tell. I didn't think of it as dangerous because I didn't have enough time to really be scared before the story ended (and on my four hour drive through the road-from-hell left me way too much time to be worried).
...

Ya, So...that's a grizzly bear... A young one, and looks to be well fed, but all the rules I know about Blacks go out the window when it comes to Browns. WOW!

My parents were Bear Techs in Sequoia for a year and learned a lot, sadly open cars are known as Lunch Boxes and the move is called a Grab And Go. About as fast as you turn to look at the picnic table the bear has your food and there's isn't anything you can do about it. It's his lunch now. laf

Wow, what an adventure! To be face to face with a Grizz! You Win!!! S-
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Post by Charles Haacker » Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:28 pm

minniev wrote:[...] The last we saw him, he was eating more flowers beside the parkway, and a foreign couple was urging their small daughter to go stand next to him for a photo. (Not a good plan).

NOT a good plan! NOT!! As Steve pointed out, that's a brown, and while all bears are unpredictable grizzlies are a whole 'nother bear. They don't seem to be disturbed by bear bells used by hikers (my Eagle Scout son likes to ask, "How can you tell grizzly scat? Look for the bear bells!"). They tell you to stand and if necessary fight with a black, but with a charging griz they tell you to fall on your face and cover your head and try to pretend you are already dead because supposedly browns don't like already dead stuff. Supposedly. And asking your little girl to go stand by ANY bear for a picture? Dum dum dum DUMMMMB! But the rangers all tell endless stories, and not just with bears.

Min, it's a terrific picture and a terrific-er story. I love the faceful of yaller flowers, probably why the folks figured their child could go near him (like Ferdinand). :o
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Post by davechinn » Tue Oct 31, 2017 5:10 pm

minniev wrote:
St3v3M wrote:I love the stories so far and have plenty of 'I Should Be Dead' moments and even an 'I Saw The Light' story, but really only one with a camera that's memorable.

.... Thank you Little-Bear! S-


I love the bear story! And of course it reminded me of one I wanted to tell. I didn't think of it as dangerous because I didn't have enough time to really be scared before the story ended (and on my four hour drive through the road-from-hell left me way too much time to be worried).

My intrepid photo friend and I stopped at Peyto Lake along Icefield parkway in Alberta and while we were taking pictures of the beautiful lake a guy warned us he'd seen a bear along the lake with binoculars and had walked around the area but couldn't find him. We were excited of course. While my friend took a bathroom break, I opened the back door to dig in my camera bag for the long lens, in case we spotted the said bear. When my friend came out she was yelling at me (there was no one else there by then), making strange gestures. I kept saying "what's wrong, I can't understand you?' till I saw her point. I turned around and standing near enough to take a bite out of my butt was this nice bear with his mouth full of yellow flowers, like he was offering them to me. I realized he was probably smelling our picnic lunch so I hopped in the back seat and shut the door. He nosed around a bit then ambled down the road, where I took this picture. We followed him back to the main road. The last we saw him, he was eating more flowers beside the parkway, and a foreign couple was urging their small daughter to go stand next to him for a photo. (Not a good plan).


Oh my Minnie !!! A terrifying event unfolds and so glad it turned out with a good ending. If I were you, I would start carrying an extra set of clothing. Did you happen to tell your husband about this event, or kept it a secret?

The foreign couple urging their small daughter to go stand next to him for a photo reminds me when I captured 'Big Kahuna', there were some people running up behind him to get a closer look. We were in the car and that was close enough for me. Makes me wonder what goes through the mind of some people, like the animal was a tame pet.
Dave

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Post by minniev » Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:54 pm

To Steve, Chuck and Dave:
It really didn't seem scary at all. He acted very complacent, just curious, and I simply sat in the car till he walked off. I was far more worried about the little girl who was being instructed to pose next to him.

I tell watered down versions of my stories to my husband, usually at least a year after the fact. He is a much more conservative traveler than I am, suspicious of all unpaved roads and undomesticated animals. Our Scotland trip would have been a disaster had it not been for Graham who took charge of the driving on all the sheep trails of the Hebrides.
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Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:32 pm

Just a thought on people and animals: having been in Scouting with my son for years we had innumerable conversations with rangers who all had the most hair-curling stories of people doing dumb stuff with wild animals, especially by encouraging their kids to get way too close. One ranger remarked that they called it "Walt Disney Syndrome." People come to national parks with the idea that wild animals are just big cuddly anthropomorphized oversized stuffed critters with sweet dispositions. It's also called "Bambi syndrome" because some of the worst injuries and even deaths are inflicted by deer. Deer are prey animals, extremely spooky but also very willing to be fed, and there are lots of news stories every single year of (especially) kids seriously injured or killed by deer, particularly from being kicked. A deer when fleeing any threat also kicks out at the threat. They turn on a dime and kick out powerfully. Kids are caught right on the head, sometimes fatally. Kids have had arteries severed in a goring. Moose are extremely near sighted and super spooky, can weigh half a ton or more and charge at 35 mph. Parents have tried to put kids on the backs of deer (and moose and bison, bears not so much but anything is possible). There are many excellent reasons why the signs and the rangers tell you over and over, DO NOT FEED ANY WILD ANIMAL, and people ignore it. Rangers point out that the cute ground squirrels get fat on food that is bad for them, can starve in the winter, can bite, can have rabies... People also ignore the signs and rangers and go off the boardwalks in Yellowstone, so there's that. :| :wall: :doh:
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Post by davechinn » Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:48 pm

Absolutely Chuck !!! Your comments reminded me of this idiot of a photographer, just to get his shot. He had a few opportunities to get up and walk away for his own safety, but chose otherwise. Its one thing to choose our own destination but another to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. So its not only kids and their parents. http://wlevy.info/interesting-video-you ... tographer/
Dave

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Post by minniev » Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:02 pm

The most egregious dangers I've witnessed were caused by parents setting up photo ops: the one who sent the girl to stand by the grizzly, another who sent a teenager to pose in front of a buffalo bull in Yellowstone, a father who had his wife (who was wearing a burka)climb down a tree to reach ground level at Athabasca Falls while holding their toddler, a woman who encouraged her husband to wade out close to the edge of Vernal Falls in Yosemite holding their infant as if he were going to drop the baby over. Some people do seem to think national parks are the same things as amusement parks.
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Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:22 pm

davechinn wrote:Absolutely Chuck !!! Your comments reminded me of this idiot of a photographer, just to get his shot. He had a few opportunities to get up and walk away for his own safety, but chose otherwise. Its one thing to choose our own destination but another to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. So its not only kids and their parents. http://wlevy.info/interesting-video-you ... tographer/
Dave

8~ (N) (?) Boy oh boy is that, um, interesting. I watched the whole thing with my jaw hanging open fully expecting him to be gored and surprised he wasn't. He kept lifting his camera and firing off long strings of spray'n'pray, then quickly chimp to see what if anything he was getting. Meanwhile the youngster may very well have interpreted the sound of the camera as a rattlesnake (or not; I doubt they'd attack a rattlesnake but whatever the idjit was doing was certainly keeping the elk's attention). I'm not totally sorry he wasn't gored (but I bet he gots lotsa deer ticks!) but I am totally sorry that a ranger didn't happen along to bust up the party and fine the eeedjit. :thumbdown:
minniev wrote:The most egregious dangers I've witnessed were caused by parents setting up photo ops: the one who sent the girl to stand by the grizzly, another who sent a teenager to pose in front of a buffalo bull in Yellowstone, a father who had his wife (who was wearing a burka)climb down a tree to reach ground level at Athabasca Falls while holding their toddler, a woman who encouraged her husband to wade out close to the edge of Vernal Falls in Yosemite holding their infant as if he were going to drop the baby over. Some people do seem to think national parks are the same things as amusement parks.

They do, they absolutely do. My son Matt is sometimes quite blunt when some of them die doing incredibly stoooopid stuff: cleaning out the gene pool. I think there's a website or something called the Darwin Awards. But KIDS can get killed because their parents don't have the brains of a gnat, and that's not sad, it's criminal.
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Post by St3v3M » Thu Nov 02, 2017 3:40 am

davechinn wrote:Absolutely Chuck !!! Your comments reminded me of this idiot of a photographer, just to get his shot. He had a few opportunities to get up and walk away for his own safety, but chose otherwise. Its one thing to choose our own destination but another to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. So its not only kids and their parents. http://wlevy.info/interesting-video-you ... tographer/
Dave

It was later reported they had to put the animal down. All for one trying to get too close. S-
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Post by davechinn » Thu Nov 02, 2017 9:07 am

That's so sad Steve.
Dave

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