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pop511
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Post by pop511 » Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:09 am

I am quite a fan of Adorama and B&H. Always something to learn.

Neil Van Niekerk in his presentation on B&H called "Direction of light. Your key to better photography".

He showed a piece of rubber that he wraps around his flash and held together with cords.
In his presentation he showed how he used it. So I thought I'll get some rubber and copy his idea.
Then in the middle of the night I thought I had a better idea and I had what I needed.
In short I have beer can holders. I use them for two reasons. As a snoot ( cut the bottom out, or a cut small hole in the bottom ) and place gear inside for protection. And the price is about $1 dollar.

Don't make the hole too small. Start at 5/8_3/4in. If holder is placed on the end of the flash you will get a sharp transition. If pulled all the way on, you will get feathering. Nice.

Beer can holders are great. They fit snug over your flash, slightly stretchable, don't warp and you can fit it inside your pocket when not in use.
So I cut one up to resemble what Neil had done.
Does it work? You better believe it!
Future experimentation:
Picture shows a can holder that I had cut down in length by 1 in.
Next time I'll leave it full size, but cut around where you see the top of the flash and so make the flag larger.
And if you don't like it, then you can still hold the beer can without getting your hands frozen.... :D
Have fun.
ed.
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Post by Steven G Webb » Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:26 am

Nicely done. Thanks for sharing this idea, it's a good one.
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Post by mikec » Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:36 pm

Great idea. Thanks for sharing.
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Post by St3v3M » Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:57 pm

pop511 wrote:...
Beer can holders are great. ...

Beer koozies are also great protection around smaller lenses and equipment! Thank you for sharing! S-
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Post by minniev » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:13 pm

Cool ideas, friends! Anything we can DIY means more resources available for the stuff we can't DIY!
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Post by Duck » Tue Aug 01, 2017 6:17 pm

This reminds me of another DIY solution for lens creeping I once saw.

Lens creeping, for anyone who has never experienced it, is when a telephoto lens' focal range changes because gravity has caused the front part of the lens to (typically) extend further out or collapse back into the lens. This happens more frequently with older lenses whose motor mechanisms have loosened somewhat.

One simple solution is to apply external friction between the focal ring and the lens body, temporarily alleviating lens creep. I have seen wide rubber bands, those "survivor" wrist bands and (what I use) fat hair bands as a DIY solution. The other one was a beer koozie where a 3/4" band was cut from the top of a koozie and placed over the lens. Cheap, easily replaceable and just enough pressure to do the job.
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Post by St3v3M » Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:02 am

Duck wrote:This reminds me of another DIY solution for lens creeping I once saw.

Lens creeping, for anyone who has never experienced it, is when a telephoto lens' focal range changes because gravity has caused the front part of the lens to (typically) extend further out or collapse back into the lens. This happens more frequently with older lenses whose motor mechanisms have loosened somewhat.

One simple solution is to apply external friction between the focal ring and the lens body, temporarily alleviating lens creep. I have seen wide rubber bands, those "survivor" wrist bands and (what I use) fat hair bands as a DIY solution. The other one was a beer koozie where a 3/4" band was cut from the top of a koozie and placed over the lens. Cheap, easily replaceable and just enough pressure to do the job.

I use a 'survivor' band around my travel lens, but a beer koozie might be better in cold environments. Thanks! S-
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Post by Duck » Wed Aug 02, 2017 1:52 am

St3v3M wrote:I use a 'survivor' band around my travel lens, but a beer koozie might be better in cold environments. Thanks! S-

I find most of these types of bands tend to be too stiff. The softer ones work better. That's why that one photographer preferred a cut off end of a koozie, softer with less pressure.
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Post by Duck » Thu Aug 03, 2017 5:13 am

I took a few minutes Monday to capture my DIY lens keeper. A drugstore hair band.

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Post by pop511 » Thu Aug 10, 2017 1:21 pm

Nice to have all this input. Any " kewl " ideas? Post them up..
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